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CSUSM EDSS 521 - EDSS 521 SYLLABUS

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Infused CompetenciesAuthorization to Teach English LearnersSpecial EducationTechnologyEDSS 521 – Literacy in the Secondary School (3 credits)Fall 2004: Part-time Cohort (CRN: 41887)Michelle Mullen, M.Ed. Class Meets: Thursdays 5:30-8:30(760) 750-8227University Hall: Room 422BOffice Hours: before and after class and by arrangementCourse DescriptionTeacher Performance Expectation CompetenciesPrimary EmphasisSecondary Emphasis:Required TextsOptional TextsOther Texts You Might Find Useful (Ask for ordering information)AssignmentsSummative Assessment Criteria for EDSS 521GRADING NOTESAttendanceTentative Calendar (Subject to Change)DateTopicReading Assignment DueAssignment Due#9: 10/28California State University San MarcosCOLLEGE OF EDUCATIONEDSS 521 – Literacy in the Secondary School (3 credits)Fall 2004: Part-time Cohort (CRN: 41887)Michelle Mullen, M.Ed. Class Meets: Thursdays 5:30-8:30 [email protected] Mission Hills HS: Room 635(760) 750-8227 University Hall: Room 422BOffice Hours: before and after class and by arrangementCourse DescriptionThis course explores the issues of literacy development—reading, writing, listening, and speaking—across core content areas of the school curriculum. This course addresses the needs of proficient readers and writers as well as those who struggle and students who are English Language Learners. It will help all1College of Education Mission StatementThe mission of the College of Education Community is to collaboratively transform public education by preparing thoughtfuleducators and advancing professional practices. We are committed to diversity, educational equity, and social justice,exemplified through reflective teaching, life-long learning, innovative research, and ongoing service. Our practices demonstratea commitment to student-centered education, diversity, collaboration, professionalism, and shared governance. (adopted by COE Governance Community October, 1997)Infused CompetenciesAuthorization to Teach English LearnersThis credential program has been specifically designed to prepare teachers for the diversity of languages often encountered inCalifornia public school classrooms. The authorization to teach English learners is met through the infusion of content andexperiences within the credential program, as well as additional coursework. Students successfully completing this programreceive a credential with authorization to teach English learners. See “Authorization to Teach English Learners Competencies.”(approved by CCTC in SB 2042 Program Standards, August 02) Special EducationConsistent with the intent to offer a seamless teaching credential in the College of Education, this course will demonstrate thecollaborative infusion of special education competencies that reflect inclusive educational practices.TechnologyThis course infuses technology competencies to prepare our candidates to use technologies, emphasizing their use in bothteaching practice and student learning. Candidates are expected to use technology as part of their professional practice, as wellStudents with Disabilities Requiring Reasonable AccommodationsStudents are approved for services through the Disabled Student Services Office (DSS). This office is located in Craven Hall5205, and can be contacted by phone at (760) 750-4905, or TTY (760) 750-4909. Students authorized by DSS to receivereasonable accommodations should meet with their instructor during office hours or, in order to ensure confidentiality, in a moreprivate setting.teachers take responsibility for fostering attitudes and skills that encourage every student to utilize successful literacy for understanding and lifelong learning.2Core Principles and Essential Questions we will pursue throughout the course:1. Reading Processes: the literacy processes and factors that affect reading development and proficiencyare complex.- How do elements of the reading process influence skilled or proficient reading?- What is the role of metacognition during the reading process?- What role does background knowledge play in reading?- How do teachers incorporate their knowledge of reading theories and processes into content lessons?2. Comprehension and Content Learning: comprehension and content learning are increased through vocabulary development, and writing, listening, discussion, and reading texts.- How do teachers support adolescents’ reading fluency, comprehension, and content learning?- How do teachers support comprehension of content text through vocabulary development?- How do teachers use writing in various genres to help adolescents understand nonfiction texts, including informational and expository texts?- How do teachers use discussion and instructional conversations to support reading comprehension?3. Adolescent Literacy: Proficient adolescent readers engage in reading texts critically and deeply.- Given what we know about who adolescents are, how they learn, and what they read, how do teachers motivate them to engage meaningfully with text?- How do teachers draw on adolescents’ multiple literacies to create a foundation for academic literacy?- How do teachers use critical literacy to deepen adolescents’ comprehension of multiple texts?- How can teachers create classroom environments that facilitate the social interaction necessary for adolescents’ literacy development?4. Assessment: Informal and formal literacy assessments guide effective secondary content instruction.- How do content teachers use literacy assessments to determine their students’ reading and writingabilities, backgrounds, and interests?- How do teachers use informal and formal assessment findings to guide the design and implementation of content lessons?- How do teachers select and evaluate the appropriateness of texts for their particular students?- When and how should teachers refer students to a reading specialist or for special education services?5. Differentiation: Adolescents learn most effectively when instruction addresses their academic, linguistic, and cultural needs and interests.- What is differentiated instruction?- How do teachers effectively differentiate instruction?- In what ways do teachers select and adapt texts and other content materials for students withdiverse literacy needs?- What instructional approaches and strategies should be selected to make content accessible for allstudents?6. Planning and Integration: Effective content lessons include the


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