New version page

Research Paper

This preview shows page 1-2-3-4 out of 12 pages.

View Full Document
View Full Document

End of preview. Want to read all 12 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a GradeBuddy member to access this document.

View Full Document
Unformatted text preview:

LizárragaLizárragaABSTRACTAndean cultural continuity and peruvian historyBibliography - cultural continuityNOTESAPENDIX NO. 1APENDIX NO. 2VocabularyCastellano-KichwaKichwa-CastellanoKaren Guthertz LizárragaLizárraga Arizona, p. 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Unkunakuchkan and wailis: an archaeolingustic study of two andean radicals 3 Bibliography 10 Notes 12 Apendix No. 1 13 Apendix No. 2 15 Appendix No. 3 Figures 15 TranslationLizárraga 6th Conf. On Gender and Archaeology Northern Arizona University p. 1 ABSTRACT A narrative belt woven in the 1970’s in the Río Pampas area of the central Andes and studied in 1992 by the Killka Project constitutes the first consideration of the unkunakuchkan figure as a radical in the Andean recording system known as killka. The focus of this pioneer study was archaeographc, employing the methodology of deconstruction to initiate the classification of birds common to the Victor Fajardo province of the departmnt of Ayacucho. Then the figure was relatd to archaeological sources on the north coast of what is today Peru. At that time gender concepts were introduced. Later the figure was defined as “pajáros enamorándose”, a literal nonvocabulary specific interpretatin of the visual image. Finally, taking into consideration the relation of pallay/archaeography/word the figure has been defined in English as “mothering”. This paper will employ archaeolinguistic methodology to explore in depth the meanings of the unkunakuchkan and wailis radicals in relation to concpts of gender and concepts of gender change through time in order to question the employment of the Christian concept of millennium as an adequate ground for the study of Andean culture, past and/or present.Lizárraga 6ª Conf. De Género y Arqueología p. 3 A narrative belt, woven in the 1970’s in the Río Pampas area of the central Andes and studied in 1992 by the Killka Project, constitutes the first consideration of the unkunakuchkan as a radical in the Andean recording system known as killka. The focus of that pioneer study was both archaeolinguistic and archaeographic, establishing new paths of inquiry in regard to Andean concepts of ethics and psychology, feminine gender, as well as employing the methodology of deconstruction to initiate the classification of birds, common to the Victor Fajardo province, department of Ayacucho (Proyecto Killka 1992-1995:68-84). Subsequently, the figure was related to ancient sources of the north coast of what is known today as Peru (Ibid, p. 122-123), as well as ancient textiles (Ibid). At that time concepts of gender were enlarged. Then the unkunakuchkan figure was defined as “pájaros enamorándose” (Ibid, p. 277-288), a non verbally specific interpretation of the visual image. Finally, taking into consideration the relation pallay/archaeograph/word, the figure most recently has been defined in English as “mothering” (Lizárraga 2000), a word without literal translation in Spanish. A provisional equivalence was found in the word madrero (Ibid), defined as “...very dear to his mother” (Diccionario Pequeño Larousse 1984:644). In this paper I will employ archaeolinguistic methodology to explore more deeply the meaning of the unkunakuchkan and waylis radicals en relation to Andean concepts of ethics, health, concepts of gender and changes in concepts of gender through time in order to question the employment of the Christian concept of millenium as an adequate base for the study of Andean culture, past and/or present. Andean cultural continuity and peruvian history As an academic theme, Andean cultural continuity has been the subject of debate for the length of the 20th century. In the early part of the century peruvian literary figure Augusto Agurirre Morales in the prologue to the short story La Justicia de Huayna Capac (1924) and the novel El Pueblo del Sol (1927/1988), manifested an Indian identity, anchored in the incipient archaeology of the times. Others ignored archaeology in favor of geography and psychology. Within this latter current of thought, associated with the emerging political Left, historian and philosopher Jose Uriel García, stated that “to turn toward the Indian is not to return to the Inca but to return to the earth and an earth consciousness” (Garcia 1930/73:190-191).(1) Nevertheless, García’s vision was impaired by a fundamental blind spot. He projected contradictory concepts of identity: one grounded in andean space, the other grounded in Spanish culture. It was after the coup of 1930 that García, Aguirre Morales and others began to be marginalized. The original contradictions, projected by them, turned into an ambivalence which underscored the development of Peruvian culture until the decade of the Eighties, when an andean ground of identity, aesthetics and communiction once again began to pervade contemporary culture. Finally, it was in 1989 that the National Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology made its historic gesture, projecting an Andean Renaissance. The initial contradictions and ambivalence, inherent in the use of language such as Indian, mestizaje (cultural mix), cholification and most recently hybrid, began to be resolved, intellectually and culturally, when the Musem initiated the restoration of the ancient calendar and the projection of a concept of cultural continuity by way of the textile tradition.Lizárraga Arizona, p. 4 Nevertheless, it was the words of García – earth consciousness - that became a key theme of the Andean Renaissance, projected by the National Museum. A year later, the historic gesture of the museum was followed by a new generation of peruvians, who began to discard the word “art” in favor of new and renewed concepts of aesthetics and communication (Lizárraga and Garay 1990). Treading the path of cultural mix in which space and time loom, like a ghost, in the background, literary figure Jose Maria Arguedas in the sixties and seventies had claimed that cultural continuity was expressed most effectively by way of literature. Creating a body of work that began to blur the line between fiction and anthropology, Arguedas defined “hispanism” as the purposeful projection of the rupture of the contemporary masses from their archaeological past (Arguedas 1975:190-191); but, he, too, made contradictory


Loading Unlocking...
Login

Join to view Research Paper and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or
We will never post anything without your permission.
Don't have an account?
Sign Up

Join to view Research Paper and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or

By creating an account you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use

Already a member?