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it’s ourV o l . 1 1 N o . 1N o r t h D a k o t a S t a t e U n i v e r s i t yC o l l e g e o f B u s i n e s s A d m i n i s t r a t i o nS u m m e r 2 0 0 5South KoreaNDSU students, faculty enjoy sights and sounds of Far East. See page 4.Leitch retires as dean, p. 22SUMMER 2005 •www.ndsu.edu/cba• COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION3Jay Leitch never aspired to be a college administrator. He didn’t even think he wanted to be a college professor. But he’s departing from the College of Business Administration having done — and excelled — as both. Beginning July 1, Jay Leitch will be known as emeritus dean in the College of Business Administration. After eight years as dean, about three years as a research assistant and 17 years as a professor in the College of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Natural Resources, Leitch is retiring. Sort of. During the next year, Leitch will help run The Sportsman’s Guide, a retail catalog and online outlet for discounted, name-brand outdoor gear. “That’s www.sportsmansguide.com,” he told 100-some well-wishers at an appreciation party in the Memorial Union Ballroom. “I’m on their board,” he explained with a smile, and then recited the Web address again.Leitch will take a year’s hiatus from campus, then he’ll be back in the classroom as a part-time faculty member in the School of Natural Resources. He expects to teach for a couple of years, until he turns 60 and is eligible for military retirement. After that, he thinks he’ll leave academia for good, but history shows Leitch — a Naval Intelligence officer, Vietnam veteran and 23-year member of the Naval Reserves — has a work ethic and versatility that keeps him where he’s needed.Leitch turned out to be just the man for the job when his predecessor left after only nine months as dean. Craig Schnell, provost and vice president for academic affairs, asked Leitch if he would accept an interim appointment for the 18 months it would take the university to complete another search. That search put Leitch in the dean’s office in his own right. “I said I’d stay for five years,” Leitch said. “It’s been eight.”Eight “incredible” years, accounting and information systems chair Chuck Harter said at Leitch’s appreciation party. When he became dean, Leitch said the college seemed to operate more like a department than a college, but with the support of faculty and staff it’s become a “dynamic, buzzing, college of business, recognized by business leaders across the state.”Here’s the short list of big things accomplished on Leitch’s watch: • Accreditation by AACSB International - The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business in December 2000.• Initiation of a college building project that’s about to go into the construction phase.• Development of college administrative policies, proce-dures and structure, including the creation of two distinct departments in 2002.• Increased faculty research, outreach and service to the business community.“Jay’s real strength is interacting with the business community,” said Gerry Macintosh, chair of manage-ment, marketing and finance. “He has participated in a lot of things that have given him credibility with business people, like the Greater North Dakota Association, and the Chamber and a lot of local and even national organizations.” Those connections have been key in drawing support for the college on many levels, but none have been more important than planning and financing a new building.“Designed for a student body of 1,500 and a faculty of 45, the new building is bound to boost enrollment,” Leitch said. “Right now, in classrooms scattered across campus, the college serves about 1,200 undergraduates and 125 MBA students. Not only will the structure unify the college, Leitch said the new Business Assistance Center will further link the college to the business community.”In the area of outreach, Leitch set a new standard for the business college. “As the state’s only water economics and tax policy guy, I had spent a third of my time running around the state talking to people about tax issues and water issues,” he said. Since land-grant university faculty are expected to extend their expertise into the real world, he made it a priority to get his business faculty face to face with business people. With the aim of increasing both interaction and visibility, he started the college’s Executive-in-Residence and Distinguished Speaker Program, bringing in top business leaders from across the Leitchcountry. And he encouraged every faculty member to join at least one civic organiza-tion. “Our human resources guy, who is from Oklahoma, joined the Sons of Norway,” Leitch said, a twinkle in his eye.During his newly gained free time, Leitch plans to do some consulting — Standing Rock Sioux Tribe is one of his clients — and volunteering with various non-profits, like Fargo-Moorhead’s Riverkeepers and Probstfield Farm Foundation, of which he’s board president. He holds a U.S. Coast Guard merchant mariner’s license, which means he can give tours of the Red River on the Riverkeepers’ pontoon, the S.S. Ruby. As for fishing, Leitch accused his colleagues of exaggerating his zeal for the hobby.Leitch is looking forward to advising graduate students and teaching when he returns to campus. It’s the contact with student leaders in the business college that Leitch said he’ll miss most, because “they’re so enthusiastic.”As for what the business faculty will miss about Leitch, it boils down to leadership, a dry sense of humor and drive. “He’s a really positive person; a real sparkplug,” Macintosh said. “He’s a high-energy person, who always has something going on. That’s what I’ll miss.”Jay Leitch shows off a 17-pound catfish he reeled in behind his home on the Red River.NDSU President Joseph Chapman has announced that Ronald D. Johnson will succeed Jay A. Leitch as dean of the College of Business Administration. Johnson is formerly dean of the Arthur J. Kania School of Business at the University of Scranton, in Scranton, Pa. Johnson joined the University of Scranton in 1997, after serving as associate dean for graduate and international programs at Virginia Tech. Johnson also has held positions at Texas A&M, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Northeast Louisiana Universities and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.


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