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AQ EN 579 - Syllabus

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Aquinas College School of Education INCLUSION I EN 579 Prerequisite: EN 201 “I’ve come to a frightening conclusion that I am the decisive element in the classroom. It’s my daily mood that makes the weather. As a teacher, I possess a tremendous power to make a child’s life miserable or joyous. I can be a tool of torture or an instrument of inspiration. I can humiliate or humor, hurt or heal. In all situations, it is my response that decides whether a crisis will be escalated or de-escalated and a child humanized or de-humanized.” Haim Ginott Nanette F. Clatterbuck, M.Ed., Assistant Professor In-the-College Office: 616.632. 2973 Evening Phone: 616.866.5979 Cell Phone: 616.340.1365 Email: [email protected]: Browne Center 124 The mission of the Aquinas College School of Education is to facilitate the development of competent, compassionate, and committed educators of integrity. Textbook: How to Reach and Teach All Students in the Inclusive Classroom, Heimberger and Rief. Other Reading Material: Articles and papers as assigned. Dates: Wednesday, August 24, 2005—Wednesday, October 12, 2005 6:30pm-10:30pm. This quad will meet the entire assigned time. Room: AB 306 Goal: To assist in preparing regular classroom teachers for future contacts with special education and 504 students, as well as, gaining an understanding of the special education process governed by federal and state rules and regulations. Academic Integrity: The Aquinas college 2005-2006 catalog addresses issues concerning academic integrity including academic dishonesty and plagiarism. Please refer to this catalog for a complete description of these policies, expectations, and possible consequences.Course Objectives: 1. Students will become familiar with special education programs and services as provided for in public and private schools, as well as learn how to access these services. Students will also learn the pre-referral and MET process as specified by national and state guidelines and laws. 2. Students will have an understanding of the historical evolution of special education programs, services, and laws to their present state as well as how present trends, institutional, and administrative factors facilitate or impede their delivery. 3. Students will understand the importance of effective collaboration between general education and special education teachers when developing strategies for responding to the unique needs of special education students within the general education classroom and curriculum. 4. Students will develop, through reading and field experiences, a first hand appreciation of the converging roles of special and regular education in modern schools. 5. Students will develop a sound philosophy of inclusionary education and will be able to defend this philosophy with a credible rationale. 6. Students will gain an understanding of the various special education categories and accompanying characteristics of each disability. 7. Students will be able to identify the various elements of an effective inclusion program based on contemporary research. Entry Level Standards and Related Proficiencies Addressed in the Course: 2.h Create inclusionary environments for students with exceptional needs and abilities. 5.a Identify and use current research in both the subject field and in other areas of practice in the profession. CEC Competencies: CC1K4 Rights and responsibilities of students, parents, teachers, and other professionals, and schools related to exceptional learning needs. CC1K5 Issues in definition and identification of individuals with exceptional learning needs, including those from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. CC1K6 Issues, assurances and due process rights related to assessment, eligibility, and placement within a continuum of services. CC1S1 Articulate personal philosophy of special education.LD1K3 Impact of legislation on the education of individuals with learning disabilities. CC2K2 Educational implications of characteristics of various exceptionalities. CC5S1 Create a safe, equitable, positive, and supportive learning environment in which diversities are valued. LD7K3 Interventions and services for children who may be at risk for learning disabilities. Course Format: 1. Active learning, direct instruction, and guest lecturers with intimate knowledge in the topical areas will be combined with videotapes and instructor lectures for our classroom time. 2. Demonstrated comprehension of assigned reading from the text, handouts, models and lectures will be the criteria for the assessment of successful completion of this course. Requirements (general): 1. Attend all class sessions, complete reading assignments, and participate in discussions and field experiences. If you cannot attend all of the classes, it will be necessary for you to drop the class and take it at a later date. Emergency situations will be dealt with on a case-by-case basis; however, a grade of A- will be the highest grade the student can obtain. 2. Be able to demonstrate knowledge of how to secure assistance in providing for the educational requirements of special need students in the general education classroom. 3. Two independent field trips and written summaries are required. Observation #1 will be due September 14, 2005, and observation #2 will be due October 5, 2005. Any deviations from the due dates must be cleared with the professor prior to these dates. Each summary should be no longer than 1-2 pages. All indicated criteria must be covered in your summary and a bulleted format is acceptable. An insightful, critical analysis of your visit is worth 20 points toward your final grade. 4 Five current scholarly journal article summaries which focus on any topic concerning special education and/or the needs of special education students. Each summary should be one page maximum in length, typed (double-spaced), Times New Roman, 12 point font. References must be cited by using the APA style of documentation (I mean it!). Each summary is worth ten points and all are due no later than October 5, 2005. 5. Small group presentation to class on the development of a program for special needs students in the regular program. Some classroom time will be provided for working on this project; however it may be necessary for some groups to meet outside of class. Presentations should be no


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