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UVM PSYC 295 - Syllabus

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Substance Abuse & Treatment PSYC 295 Fall 2007 Syllabus Instructor: Erica Peters, B.A. Predoctoral student in Clinical Psychology Departments of Psychology & Psychiatry University of Vermont Office Location: Ira Allen School (38 Fletcher Place), Room 109 Phone Number: 656-9626 E-mail: [email protected] Office Hours: Monday 10am-12pm; Wednesday 1-3pm Course Information: Number of Credit Hours: 3 Meeting Time and Location: Tuesday, 5-8PM Class Size: 30 students Prerequisite: PSYC 001 – General Psychology Catalog Description: This course is designed to provide a comprehensive understanding of substance use disorders (SUDs). Through class lecture and discussion and outside readings, students will learn about the causes and treatment of SUDs, as well as the societal impact of these disorders. Students will apply this knowledge by formulating conceptualizations and proposing treatment through case studies. Goal and Structure: Welcome to Psychology 295, Substance Abuse & Treatment! The goal of this course is for students to, first, acquire knowledge in identifying, assessing, and treating substance use disorders (SUDs), and then apply this knowledge to case examples. I believe that students can accomplish this goal and, more importantly, be engaged in this course through a combination of passive learning (which is necessary to learn the material!) and active learning (so that students can critically think about the material and apply what they have gained). Therefore, class meetings and assignments will be structured around this combination. Class meetings will last three hours, incorporating lecture and discussion. Lectures will cover a rationale for the topic of the class and a comprehensive review of the topic, incorporating assigned readings. Whenever possible, I will utilize a variety of material in my lecture, including role-plays and relevant selections from movies. Informed discussion will be led by me, but students are expected to actively participate and ask thoughtful questions. Assignments will consist of weekly readings, two midterm examinations, a final examination, and a research project. Weekly reading assignments will cover textbook chapters and current empirical research. The examinations will cover readings and class discussion and will require students to apply their knowledge to case examples. More on the research project later…..Specific Objectives: 1. Define diagnostic and clinical features of SUDs. 2. Describe the epidemiology, genetics, neurobiology, and social context of SUDs. 3. Demonstrate a comprehensive assessment of SUDs, and discuss treatment of SUDs, including research-documented efficacy of different treatment modalities. 4. Apply knowledge to case studies. Materials: 1. Textbook: Lowinson, J.H., et al. (2004). Substance Abuse: A Comprehensive Textbook, 4th Edition. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. 2. Selected readings that will be distributed in class. • Budney, A.J., Moore, B.A., Vandrey, R.G. & Hughes, J.R. (2003). The time course and significance of cannabis withdrawal. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 112, 393-402. • Carroll, K.M. & Rounsaville, B.J. (2002). On beyond urine: clinically useful assessment instruments in the treatment of drug dependence. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 40, 1329-1344. • Helzer, J.E., van den Brink, W. & Guth, S.E. (2006). Should there be both categorical and dimensional criteria for the substance use disorders in the DSM-V? Addiction, 101, 17-22. • Higgins, S.T., Budney, A.J., Bickel, W.K., Hughes, J.R., Foerg, F. & Badger, G. (1993). Achieving cocaine abstinence with a behavioral approach. American Journal of Psychiatry, 150, 763-769. • Hser, Y., Anglin, M.D. & Powers, K. (1993). A 24-year follow-up of California narcotics addicts. Archives of General Psychiatry, 50, 577-584. • Hughes, J.R. (2004). Nicotine-related disorders. In B.J. Sadock & V.A. Sadock (Eds.), Kaplan & Sadock’s Comprehensive Textbook of Psychiatry, 8th Edition (pp. 1257-1265). Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. (to be distributed in class) • Kessler, R.C. (2004). Impact of substance abuse on the diagnosis, course, and treatment of mood disorders: the epidemiology of dual diagnosis. Biological Psychiatry, 56, 730-737. • McCrady, B.S. (2001). Alcohol Use Disorders. In D.H. Barlow, Ed., Clinical Handbok of Psychological Disorders, 3rd Edition. New York: The Guilford Press. (to be distributed in class) 2• McLellan, A.T., Lewis, D.C., O’Brien, C.P. & Kleber, H.D. (2000). Drug dependence, a chronic medical illness: Implications for treatment, insurance, and outcomes evaluation. JAMA, 284, 1689-1695. • Project MATCH Research Group (1997). Matching alcoholism treatments to client heterogeneity: Project MATCH posttreatment drinking outcomes. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 58, 7-29. • Sloboda, Z. (2005). Epidemiology of Drug Abuse. New York: Springer. (selected portions to be distributed in class) Research Project: At the first class meeting, I will randomly assign students to groups of 2 or 3. I will provide a list of possible topics for the research project, and each group will decide which topic to research. Each topic will deal with one class of substances, so during the class meeting where we discuss a class of substances, this group will make a 15-minute presentation to the class on what they have researched and then lead a discussion of their topic. They will also submit a 5-10 page paper on their research topic when they make their presentation. Finally, they will submit to me a rough draft of this paper 3 weeks before their presentation. Course Requirements: 1. I expect that students will attend every class, read the assigned material before class, and participate in discussion of the material. If a student must miss class, he will notify me at least 24 hours before the class meeting. Class participation will account for 10 points (10% of the final grade). 2. Two midterm examinations will account for 25 points in total (12.5 points each; 25% of the final grade). They will be taken during regular class time in our regular classroom. The first midterm examination will cover all material from the beginning of the course, and the second midterm examination will cover all material since the first midterm examination. 3. A final examination will account for 35


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