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STOCKTON LITT 2413 - Punctuation - History & Craft Syllabus

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1 Punctuation: History & Craft In a Station of the Metro The apparition of these faces in the crowd; petals on a wet, black bough. Ezra Pound Litt-2413-001 Spring 2011 TR 12:30-2:20 meeting in lovely F-221: for the first time Thomas Kinsella [email protected] J-230, Ext. 4419 Office Hours: TR 11:00-12:00; 4:30-5:30; and by appointment. I’m on campus most days. Required Texts Tom Kinsella. A Brief Guide to Punctuation. 2010. ISBN: None yet. This will be provided on the first day of class. Eric Partridge. You Have a Point There. Routledge, Kegan, & Paul, 1978. ISBN: 978-0415050753 Class Weblog http://wp.stockton.edu/punctuationcourse/ Goals & Focus of Course The primary goal of this course is to enable all participants to read and write punctuation at the highest level. Understanding and applying appropriate punctuation is an acquired skill that, at times, involves calculated artistry. As it pertains to punctuation, this course is designed to help students improve both their skill and artistry. In the hands of an accomplished writer, punctuation is integral to intelligent and graceful composition. We will strive for such understanding and skill. A secondary, but important goal of this course is to suggest the rich and ever-changing tapestry of usage across the history of punctuation.Punctuation: History & Craft, Spring 2011 2 Course Policies Excellent attendance is mandatory. More than 4 absences and your grade will drop one full letter grade; more than 6 and it will drop two. Understand that assignments cannot be done at the last moment. I intend to rigorously enforce the due dates in this syllabus. You will need to plan accordingly. If you need extra help, ask for it. E-mail is an excellent way to contact me. It is not my responsibility to make sure that you have handed in all assignments; it is yours. Academic Honesty The Literature program expects students to maintain the highest standard of academic honesty. Please review Stockton’s Academic Honesty Policy, which can be found in the Student Handbook. You should also make yourself familiar with the penalties for violations of the policy and your rights as a student. All work that you turn in must be your own. Please be aware that plagiarism (one form of academic dishonesty) includes, but may not be limited to, using all or part of a source, either directly or in paraphrase, either intentionally or unintentionally, whether that source is published, or online, or taken from a fellow or former student, without proper acknowledgment. If you are found to have plagiarized, intentionally, or unintentionally, you will face serious consequences, as follows: 1. If this is the first time the student has been found to have plagiarized, he/she will receive an “F” for that paper or assignment and/or the course. 2. For second offenses of plagiarism, the student will receive an F for the course. 3. Whenever possible, a student who is found to have plagiarized a paper or assignment, in full or in part, should meet with the professor of the class for which the paper is written in order to review and discuss the plagiarized work. Additionally, in accordance with Stockton College policy, literature faculty will report all instances of plagiarism to the Provost of Academic Affairs. Students may be subject to discipline by the college, such as being placed on academic probation or expelled. If it is the final assignment that is plagiarized, although I will not necessarily meet with the student, I will report the incident to the Provost of Academic Affairs. If you have any questions about plagiarism, I will be glad to discuss them with you. Email Email is the best way to contact me. Please remember to provide a coherent subject line. Also, remember to include your name in the text of the email.Punctuation: History & Craft, Spring 2011 3 Week 1 January 18 Introduction to the course. Handouts – A Brief Guide to Punctuation; “Commas and Canaries.” {Drop/Add from Tuesday the 18th through Tuesday the 25th.} A. A. Milne born, 1882. 20 Introduction to phrases & clauses. Week 2 25 Phrases & clauses; begin discussion of “Commas and Canaries.” {End of Drop/Add; Deadline to drop a course with 100% refund.} Robert Burns born, 1759. 27 Phrases & Clauses; A Brief Guide to Punctuation. Charles Lutwidge Dodgson born, 1832. Week 3 February 1 A Brief Guide to Punctuation; continued discussion of “Commas and Canaries.” {Deadline to file for Spring 2011 graduation application.} Langston Hughes born, 1902. 3 A Brief Guide to Punctuation; continued discussion of “Commas and Canaries.” Week 4 8 A Brief Guide to Punctuation; continued discussion of “Commas and Canaries.” John Ruskin born, 1819. 10 First Examination: Grammar & Punctuation. Handout for Space Between Words. Week 5 15 Discussion of Space Between Words.. 17 Discussion of Space Between Words. {Friday, February 18 is Deadline to withdraw from a full-term course with a 50% refund.}Punctuation: History & Craft, Spring 2011 4 Week 6 22 Partridge. George Washington’s Birthday; February 11, O.S. 24 Partridge. Wilhelm Grimm born, 1786. Week 7 March 1 Partridge. 3 Partridge. Week 8 8 First Individual Punctuation Essay due: Analysis of six or more examples from literature, newspapers/on-line media, and advertising plus framing discussion. Discussion Partridge. 10 Partridge. March 14-18 – Spring Break Week 9 22 Partridge. {Fall 2011 Preregistration Schedule of Classes posted.} 24 Partridge. William Morris born, 1834. Week 10 29 Preceptorial advising; no classes. 31 Preparation for second examination. Week 11 April 5 Preparation for Second Examination. 6 Preceptorial advising; no classes.Punctuation: History & Craft, Spring 2011 5 7 Second Examination. William Wordsworth born, 1770. Week 12 12 Discussion of Typography/design/layout. 14 Introduction to texting survey; introduction to Creative Essay Assignment. {Monday, April 18th is the Deadline to withdraw from a full-term course with a W grade.} Noah Webster copyrighted the first edition of his dictionary, 1828. Week 13 19 Second Individual Punctuation Essay due: Analysis of six or more examples from literature, newspapers/on-line media, and advertising plus framing discussion. Readings from Samuel Johnson: analysis of periodic sentence structure. 21 Readings from Ernest Hemingway and others. Week 14 26 Discussion of texting experiment; the


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