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SECTION III – EVIDENCE FOR MEETING STANDARDS

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28SECTION III – EVIDENCE FOR MEETING STANDARDSStandard 1 – Candidate Knowledge, Skills, and DispositionsCandidates preparing to work in schools as teachers or other professional school personnelknow and demonstrate the content, pedagogical, and professional knowledge, skills, anddispositions necessary to help all students learn. Assessments indicate that candidates meetprofessional, state, and institutional standards.Element 1: Content Knowledge for Teacher Candidates1.1 Undergraduate Initial LicensureIn 1998, Ohio redesigned its teacher licensure programs. This transition necessitated theredesign of all undergraduate education programs at Marietta College. Secondary educationsingle subject certification programs were redesigned as Adolescent Young Adult licensureprograms in Integrated Language Arts, Integrated Math, Integrated Social Studies, IntegratedLife Science, and Integrated Life Science/Chemistry. Ohio’s Elementary Education, 1 – 8,certificate was dropped and Early Childhood, PK – grade 3, and Middle Childhood, grades 4 – 9,licenses were added. The first cohort of Marietta College candidates to complete these programsfinished in the spring of 2002. Comparisons of program completers through December, 2001with program completers after that point involves looking at candidates who completed two verydifferent programs. Beginning with the Spring 2002 cohort, candidates in these new programswere assessed with a new portfolio evaluation rubric, a revised student teaching evaluationrubric, and a new set of Praxis II exams. For this reason, the data in this section is limited to datafor candidates who entered Marietta College in the fall of 1998 (2002 cohort) and later.Content knowledge for undergraduate teacher candidates is assessed using a comprehensive setof assessments that incorporate performance on standardized tests, performance in content areacoursework, performance during field and clinical experiences, and a capstone portfolio withnumerous components. Data is collected informally during the candidate’s coursework and isformally collected and aggregated upon application to the Professional Licensure Program,application to student teaching, and upon program completion. This process is summarized inTable 10 and fully discussed in the paragraphs that follow.Table 10: Assessment Points for Content Knowledge for Undergraduate Licensure CandidatesAssessment PointData SourcesI. Application to the Professional LicensureProgram (Stage 2 - following the completionof 45 semester hours)Basic Skills Assessment• Overall cumulative G.P.A: minimum 2.75• Praxis I PPST Mathematics Test: minimum174• Praxis I PPST Reading Test: minimum 175• Praxis I PPST Writing Test: minimum 173( Alternative – ACT: minimum 23 or SAT:Minimum 1060 )• English 101: minimum grade of C• Communication 101: minimum grade of C29II. Application to Student Teaching (Stage 3- following completion of all other requirededucation coursework)Content Knowledge Assessment• Overall cumulative G.P.A: minimum 2.75• Content Area(s) G.P.A: minimum 2.67(middle and AYA programs)• Recommendation from a faculty member ineach of the candidate’s content areas• Math 113: minimum grade of C (earlychildhood program)III. Completion of Student Teaching andRecommendation for Licensure (Stage 4)Content Knowledge Assessment• Student Teaching Evaluation Rubric:acceptable rating on item MC.4• Capstone Portfolio Rubric: acceptablerating on item II.A• Required Praxis II Content Test(s):minimum Ohio passing scoreStage I. Application to the Professional Licensure ProgramContent knowledge for candidates is first assessed upon application for admission to theProfessional Licensure Program, which can occur after the completion of a minimum of 45semester hours. Because Marietta College believes that all teacher candidates should beproficient in communication and quantitative skills, these basic skills are assessed at this point.One source for this data, the candidate’s overall G.P.A. upon application to the ProfessionalLicensure Program, reflects course work in general education and in 100 and 200 level educationcourses. Communication skills are specifically assessed through a review of grades in English101, English Composition and Communication 101, Foundations of Oral Communication. Allcandidates must have a grade of C or better in these courses. Table 11 shows aggregated resultsof the assessment of overall G.P.A. and communications skills courses for ProfessionalLicensure Program applicants over the past 3 years. Beginning with the fall of 2001(2005 cohortgroup), candidates are required to submit scores from the Praxis I Pre-Professional Sills tests inreading, writing, and mathematics. Candidates who have a minimum ACT composite score of23 or an SAT composite of 1060 may use these scores in lieu of the Praxis I requirements. Table12 depicts average basic skills assessment scores for applicants over the past 3 years. Assistancefor candidates who need basic skill development is available through the Marietta CollegeWriting Center and the Academic Resource Center.Table 11: Average Overall G.P.A. and Communications Course Grades for Applicants to Professional LicensureAve.OverallG.P.ATransferEnglish,Commcourses ( >C-)English 101 GradesCommunication 101GradesCohort GroupA, A-B+, B, B-C+, CA, A-B+, B, B-C+, C2004 n =333.17176106101322005 n =163.08153613622006 n =413.362010153917530Table 12: Basic Skills Assessment Scores for Program ApplicantsCohort GroupAve. MathPPST ScoreAve. ReadingPPST ScoreAve. WritingPPST ScoreAve. ACTScore*Ave. SATScore*2004(this requirement applied to transfer student only for this cohort group)2005 n =16179.2178.5176.524.2510702006 n =18180175174.227.751210* average ACT/SAT scores for candidates exempt for Praxis I requirementDuring the candidate’s program, content knowledge is further assessed through the use offormative evaluations of performance in field experience. A new field experience evaluationinstrument, which provides a rubric aligned with program outcomes, was implemented fullyduring the 2003-04 academic year. This instrument replaced a variety of open-ended instrumentsthat had been used for various experiences and will allow for the aggregation of data ondemonstration of content knowledge in field experiences across levels and programs.Stage II. Application to Student TeachingUpon application to student teaching, content


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