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TOURO GHS 203 - Course Syllabus - GHS 203

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COURSE/DEPARTMENTAL OBJECTIVESCOURSE/INSTITUTIONAL OBJECTIVESHARDWARE/SOFTWARE/MATERIALS REQUIREMENTSCOURSE REQUIREMENTSGRADING GUIDELINESMETHODOLOGYCOURSE TEXTTOURO COLLEGE COURSE SYLLABUSNEW YORK SCHOOL OF CAREER AND APPLIED STUDIESDEPARTMENT: History and Social StudiesCOURSE TITLE: The Immigrant ExperienceCOURSE NUMBER: GHS 203 PREREQUISTES: NoneCREDIT HOURS: 3DEVELOPERS: Revised by Dean Leon Perkal, Dr. Jacob Lieberman and the Faculty of the History DepartmentLAST UPDATE: October 15, 2003COURSE DESCRIPTIONThe unique immigrant experience of various ethnic groups. Conditions in foreign countries which gave impetus to emigrations, difficulties in adjustment and acculturation, specific areas of achievement, attempts to preserve ethnic identity within the American mainstream and contemporary issues and problems.COURSE/DEPARTMENTAL OBJECTIVES- To appreciate the contributions of immigrants to America- To understand the forces of discrimination - past and present within American society.- To realize the problems attendant to the acculturation process.- To introduce students to an appreciation of primary documents as a vital source in the shaping of history.- To familiarize the student with the use of historical evidence in constructing the past, the methods by which a historian recreates the past, the models of explanation the historian employs to comprehend the past.- To encourage the students to generalize, to relate the particular events to general proportions, to compare and contrast, to rearrange and reorder facts and figures in order to arrive at fresh conclusions.- Be able to use the Internet and other technical resources to do historical work.- Be able to integrate within a historical report basic writing skills and an awareness of how history is written.COURSE/INSTITUTIONAL OBJECTIVESThis course is intended to:- To enrich the students’ appreciation of the Jewish heritage- To promote understanding of intergroup relations in a pluralistic society- To further pre-professional career interests of students in the fields of community service and work in cultural institutions- Promote the study of the traditional arts and sciences- Foster an appreciation of scholarship and enhance research skills in the fields of history and the other social studies- Develop critical reading and listening skills- Develop students’ critical reasoning skills- Foster analytical thinking and to develop students’ abilities to solve problems- Prepare students to communicate clearly in spoken and written forms- Foster students’ abilities to access and evaluate information objectively and effectively- Foster a respect for and an appreciation of cultural diversity- Enhance a global perspective regarding economic, social and cultural issuesTOPICS TO BE COVERED- Introduction: Changing Perspectives on the Immigrant in American Life- The First Immigrants:a. First Americans - Native Americansb. Old World backgroundc. Causes for immigrationd. Puritanse. SettlementsReadings: Dinnerstein, Ch. 1- The African-American Experiencea. Racism - European rootsb. The voyagec. Institutional slaveryd. Black responsese. Southern civilizationf. Acculturation of the African AmericansReadings: Dinnerstein, Ch. 2. Film & documents on slavery- Immigration in Ante-bellum Northa. Impact of Industrializationb. The pull of Americac. Westward movement d. Religious migration e Assimilation before 1860 Readings: Dinnerstein, Ch. 3- "The Old Immigrant" Wavea. Germansb. Irishc. Nativist reaction d. Post war living conditions e. Assimilation of the "Old Immigrants" Readings: Dinnerstein, Ch. 4- The "New Immigrant" Wavea. Industrial Revolutionb. East European Jews c. Slavsd. Italianse. African-Americans Move Northf. Assimilation of the New ImmigrantsReadings: Dinnerstein, Chapter 5; Film- Adjusting to Americaa. City Lifeb. Culture & Religionc. Pressure of Americanizationd. Mobilitye. The Difficulties of Assimilation in the 20th CenturyReadings: Dinnerstein, Ch. 6- Settling in the Westa. The Indian questionb. Asiansc. Mormons and Mexicansd. Assimilation in the "Wild West"Visit to Museum of American Indian- Ethnic Conflicta. Racism & Social Darwinismb. Jim Crowc. World War Id. Quotas institutede. World War IIf. Assimilation vs. PluralismReadings: Dinnerstein, Ch. 8- Toward Pluralistic Societya. Civil Rights revolutionb. Hispanicsc. White ethnicsd. Chicanos and Indianse. Assimilation vs. PluralismReadings: Dinnerstein, Chapters 9 & 10- New York as A contemporary case study: African Americans and Puerto Ricansa. Employment and educationb. Family and neighborhoodc. Politicsd. Culture and religione. Assimilation of the "Natives"Readings: Glazer & Moynihan, pp. 24-136- New York as A contemporary case study: Jews and Italiansa. Employment and educationb. Family and neighborhoodc. Politicsd. Culture and religione. A Comparison of Jewish and Italian AdjustmentReadings: Instructor will supply hand outs- New York as A contemporary case study: The Irisha. Employment and educationb. Family and neighborhoodc. Politicsd. Culture and religionReadings Glazer & Moynihan, pp. 217-287Visit to Ellis Island and Statue of LibertyHARDWARE/SOFTWARE/MATERIALS REQUIREMENTSAlthough this is not a course taught on-line, it is expected that the instructor and the students will make regular use of the facilities available through the Internet and other digital facilities. Appropriate access should be available to the Computer Lab on-site and reasonable support provided for soft-ware in the field, including CD-ROM materials.COURSE REQUIREMENTS- Reading of Assignments and other materials as scheduled- Participation in class discussion and other on-site activities- Research ReportPaper or Critique of Historical WorkA. Student Argument or Author’s ThesisB. Analysis of Sources, Primary and Secondary, including Digital ResourcesC. Student or Author’s Point of ViewD. Student’s Learning on this TopicPlentiful resources for research exist:The Touro Libraries: Brooklyn and Manhattan Main and Extension Campuses: All are equipped with Internet, Touro Web Library and other Computerized Facilities, as well as Print and other media. Inter-library location and borrowing facilities are available.The New York Public Library: Both Circulating


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