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SUNY Plattsburgh BIO 323 - Arthropods 2

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Subphylum MyriapodaSlide 2Class ChilopodaSlide 4Slide 5Slide 6Slide 7Class DiplopodaSlide 9Slide 10Slide 11Slide 12Slide 13Slide 14Subphylum CrustaceaCrustaceansLobster appendagesSlide 18Slide 19Slide 20Slide 21Slide 22Slide 23Slide 24Crustacean reproductionSlide 26Subphylum Crustacea: Class BranchiopodaSlide 28Slide 29CladoceraSubphylum Crustacea: Class MaxillopodaCopepodaSlide 33BranchiuraSlide 35Slide 36Slide 37CirripediaSlide 39Barnacle reproductionSlide 41Barnacles feeding and matingSlide 43Slide 44Subphylum Crustacea: Class MalacostracaIsopodsSlide 47Tongue-eating louseSlide 49Tongue eating louseEuphausiaceaSlide 52Slide 53EuphausidsSlide 55Whale feedingKrill and whalesWhale bubble netting clipDecapodaSlide 60Slide 61Slide 62Subphylum HexapodaSlide 64Class EntognathaSlide 66Subphylum Hexapoda: Class InsectaClass InsectaSlide 69Slide 70Slide 71Slide 72Class Insecta: flightSlide 74Slide 75Slide 76Slide 77Class Insecta: Gas ExchangeSlide 79Slide 80Class Insecta: MetamorphosisSlide 82Slide 83Slide 84Class Insecta: important ordersSlide 86Slide 87Slide 88Slide 89Slide 90Slide 91Slide 92Slide 93Slide 94Social behaviorEvolution of EusocialityEvolution of Eusociality in insectsHoney Bee nestsSlide 99Slide 100Honey bee foragingSlide 102Slide 103Slide 104Slide 105Slide 106Slide 107Slide 108Slide 109Waggle danceAnt socialitySlide 112Slide 113Termite coloniesSlide 115Haplodiploidy and eusocial HymenopteraSlide 117Slide 118Slide 119Slide 120Haplodiploidy and eusocialitySlide 122Slide 123Slide 124Slide 125Slide 126Slide 127Slide 128Insects and humans: benefitsInsects and humans:benefitsInsects and humans: costsSlide 132Slide 133Subphylum MyriapodaSubphylum MyriapodaMyriapoda (Greek “many feet”) includes two Myriapoda (Greek “many feet”) includes two major groups the Chilopoda (centipedes) and major groups the Chilopoda (centipedes) and Diplopoda (millipedes) as well as two smaller Diplopoda (millipedes) as well as two smaller groups the Symphyla and the Pauropoda, both groups the Symphyla and the Pauropoda, both of which are small soil-dwelling organisms.of which are small soil-dwelling organisms.Myriapods have a head with simple eyes and a Myriapods have a head with simple eyes and a segmented trunk which carries paired segmented trunk which carries paired appendages, one per segment in centipedes appendages, one per segment in centipedes and in most segments two in millipedes.and in most segments two in millipedes.Subphylum MyriapodaSubphylum MyriapodaOn the head myriapods have one pair of On the head myriapods have one pair of antennae, mandibles and one or two pairs antennae, mandibles and one or two pairs of maxillae or feeding appendages.of maxillae or feeding appendages.Walking legs are found on the abdominal Walking legs are found on the abdominal segments.segments.Class ChilopodaClass ChilopodaThere are about 3,000 described species and an estimated There are about 3,000 described species and an estimated 8,000 worldwide.8,000 worldwide.Centipedes (from the Latin for hundred feet) differ from Centipedes (from the Latin for hundred feet) differ from millipedes in that each segment bears only one pair of millipedes in that each segment bears only one pair of appendages. They always have an odd number of appendages. They always have an odd number of pairspairs of of legs.legs. Distribution is worldwide ranging from Tropics to the Arctic Distribution is worldwide ranging from Tropics to the Arctic Circle. Require moist microhabitats because the cuticle is Circle. Require moist microhabitats because the cuticle is not waxy and so is not watertight.not waxy and so is not watertight.Respiration is primarily via a tracheal system, but a few Respiration is primarily via a tracheal system, but a few species exchange gases across the body surface.species exchange gases across the body surface.Class ChilopodaClass ChilopodaCentipedes range in size from a few Centipedes range in size from a few millimeters long to 30cm (the Amazonian millimeters long to 30cm (the Amazonian Giant Centipede), which makes them Giant Centipede), which makes them some of the largest terrestrial invertebrate some of the largest terrestrial invertebrate predators and they are a significant predators and they are a significant element of the predatory biomass in many element of the predatory biomass in many invertebrate communities.invertebrate communities.http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.cutehomepets.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/giant-centipede.jpgClass ChilopodaClass ChilopodaThe first pair of appendages have been modified The first pair of appendages have been modified into poison fangs (forcipules), which they use to into poison fangs (forcipules), which they use to kill prey.kill prey.Centipedes are active predators that hunt in leaf Centipedes are active predators that hunt in leaf litter, under logs and in similar damp, dark litter, under logs and in similar damp, dark places for prey.places for prey.The body is dorsoventrally flattened, which The body is dorsoventrally flattened, which probably allows the centipede to squeeze into probably allows the centipede to squeeze into small spaces in pursuit of prey.small spaces in pursuit of prey.12.32BFigure 20.01Class DiplopodaClass DiplopodaDiplopods are commonly called millipedes (Latin Diplopods are commonly called millipedes (Latin “thousand feet”). Most have 36-400 legs with “thousand feet”). Most have 36-400 legs with 750 being the maximum.750 being the maximum.They have a distinctively cylindrical body and They have a distinctively cylindrical body and this coupled with the fact that most segments this coupled with the fact that most segments have two pairs of legs (all but the first four have two pairs of legs (all but the first four thoracic segments, which have one pair each) thoracic segments, which have one pair each) makes millipedes hard to misidentify.makes millipedes hard to misidentify.Class DiplopodaClass DiplopodaThere are about 10,000 described species and There are about 10,000 described species and they occur worldwide. they occur worldwide. Millipedes range from a few millimeters in length Millipedes range from a few millimeters in length up to 38 cm (the African giant Millipede).up to 38 cm (the African giant Millipede).The largest terrestrial invertebrate ever was a The largest terrestrial invertebrate ever was a 2.6 meter long millipede 2.6 meter


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