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UMD GVPT 708A - Syllabus

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1 GVPT 708A – Seminar in International Relations Theory Fall 2008 Tuesdays 12:30-3:15pm Tydings 1136 Prof. Virginia Haufler Prof. Scott Kastner 405-4122 405-9710 [email protected] [email protected] This seminar introduces students to the key theoretical, methodological, and substantive concerns in international relations scholarship. We begin the course with an overview of the major paradigms and approaches as exemplified by key scholars. We then examine specific substantive issues and empirical applications. We will examine enduring debates in the field of international relations, and contemporary advances in scholarship. The goal is to convey how the field has evolved, and how scholars frame questions and conduct empirical research. The course is designed as the core seminar for Ph.D. students enrolled in the Government and Politics graduate program who have chosen international relations as one of their areas of specialization. Participation in discussion is a key element of a graduate seminar—intellectual debate sharpens your understanding and enhances learning. We expect everyone to do all the readings in advance of class, and regularly contribute to discussions in class. The course will be co-taught by Professors Haufler and Kastner, and all sections will be held at the time and place listed above. However, students will be registered for separate sections and evaluated by only one professor. Course Requirements: Research Design Paper (50%)—The main requirement will be a written research design/ research proposal. A 2-3 page summary/ outline will be due October 14, and the final paper will be due December 9. We will discuss this assignment in more detail during class to make sure you understand the nature of a research design and our expectations. Response Papers (20%)—These are 2-3 page papers that respond to the readings for a particular week; you will be required to do three of these, and on the days when you do these papers you will be expected to assist in leading class discussion. Participation (20%)—Contribute to discussion each week in class. We expect everyone to come to class each week with questions to ask and comments to make, and be willing to engage the ideas presented by fellow students. Presentation (10%)—Every student will present to the class a brief summary of their research design. This will be well in advance of the due date for the papers, in order to give you time to revise them in response to comments.2 Readings: We have ordered key texts for you to buy from the University Book Center and Maryland Book Exchange. All books have been put on reserve at McKeldin Library. The journal articles are available through online databases via the University library’s Research Port. We also recommend the following supplementary books which address research design issues: Stephen Van Evera, Guide to Methods for Students of Political Science Gary King, Robert Keohane, Sidney Verba, Designing Social Inquiry Alexander George and Andrew Bennett, Case Studies and Theory Development In the Social Sciences Detlev Sprinz and Yael Wolinsky-Nahmias, Models, umbers and Cases Audie Klotz and Cecelia Lynch, Strategies for Research in Constructivist International Relations Schedule: Sept. 2: Introduction Miles Kahler, “Inventing International Relations,” in ew Thinking in International Relations eds. Michael Doyle and John G. Ikenberry Section I: Alternative Theoretical Approaches to the Study of World Politics Sept. 9: Realism: Anarchy, Balancing, and Power Kenneth Waltz, Theory of International Politics chs. 5-6 John Mearsheimer, The Tragedy of Great Power Politics chs. 1-3 Charles Glaser, “The Security Dilemma Revisited,” World Politics 50, 1 1997 Randall Scweller, “Unanswered Threats: A Neoclassical Realist Theory of Underbalancing,” International Security (IS hereafter) 29,2 2004 T.V. Paul, “Soft Balancing in the Age of US Primacy,” IS 2005 30,1 2005 Sept. 16: Liberalism: Individuals, Institutions and Interdependence Andrew Moravcsik, “Taking Preferences Seriously: A Liberal Theory of International Politics,” International Organization (IO hereafter) 51,4 1997 G. John Ikenberry, After Victory, chs.1-3 and 6 Robert Putnam, “Diplomacy and Domestic Politics: The Logic of Two-Level Games,” IO 42,1 1988 Robert Keohane After Hegemony, chs.4-63 Sept. 23: Constructivism: Ideas, Identity and Relations Alexander Wendt, “Anarchy is What States Make of it: The Social Construction of Power Politics,” IO 46,2 1992 Peter Katzentstein, ed. The Culture of ational Security chs. 1-2 and 5 Jennifer Sterling-Folker, “Realism and the Constructivist Challenge,” International Studies Review 4,1 2002 Jeffrey Legro, Rethinking the World, chs. 1-3 J. Anne Tickner, “What is Your Research Program? Some Feminist Answers to International Relations Methodological Questions,” International Studies Quarterly (ISQ hereafter) 49,1 2005 Sept. 30: Rationalist and Cognitive Approaches David Lake and Robert Powell, Strategic Choice and International Relations, chs.1-3 Jeffrey Checkel, “International Norms and Domestic Politics: Bridging the Rationalist- Constructivist Divide,” European Journal of International Relations 3,4 1997 Robert Jervis, “Hypotheses on Misperception,” World Politics 20,3 1968 Jack S. Levy, “Prospect Theory, Rational Choice, and International Relations,” ISQ 41,1 1997 Section II: The Study of War and Peace Oct. 7: War and Deterrence Thomas Schelling, Arms and Influence, chs.2-3 James Fearon, “Rationalist Explanations for War,” IO 49,3 1995 Anne Sartori, “The Might of the Pen: A Reputational Theory of Communication in International Disputes,” IO 56,1 2002 Robert Pape, “The Strategic Logic of Suicide Terrorism,” APSR 97,3 2003 Peter Katzenstein, The Culture of ational Security Ch.4 Oct. 14: Democratic Peace Paul Huth and Todd Allee, The Democratic Peace and Territorial Conflict in the Twentieth Century, chs.4-5,7,9 Edward Mansfield and Jack Snyder, Electing To Fight chs.2-3,5 Erik Gartzke, “ The Capitalist Peace,” American Journal of Political Science 51,1 2007 Kenneth A. Schultz, “Do Democratic Institutions Constrain or Inform? Contrasting Two Institutional Perspectives on Democracy and War, “ IO 53,2 1999 Oct. 21: Peace and


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