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CSUB ART 384 - syllabus

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Class ComportmentART 384, ITALIAN RENAISSANCE ART PROFESSOR SHELLEY STONE OFFICE: DDHC108 (Tel. 665-6029) OFFICE HOURS: MW 1-2, T 5:15-5:45, by appointment. E-Mail: [email protected] The modern modes of society in Europe and the Americas developed.from the civilization of the Renaissance in Italy. Renaissance (means "rebirth") Italians sought to create a new society in which belief in Christianity was tempered by the revival of concepts borrowed from the pagan culture of Classical Antiquity. In art, the Italian Renaissance broke away from the abstract formalism characteristic of the Medieval styles of European art, and sought to imitate nature, spurred on by the example of Classical art. Beyond the imitation of nature Renaissance art and society generally sought balance, order and deep spiritual meaning. These are the qualities of Renaissance art which still move us today, since they are universal values. Renaissance Italy produced some of the greatest artists in world history: Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael and Donatello are only a few of the names that still hold magic today. This course will examine the development of Italian art and architecture from ca. 1300 to ca. 1550, focusing on the major artists and architects in this period as well as art as an expression of Renaissance values. Grading Grading for the course will be based on a three tests (each worth 15% of the final grade, or 60 points each), a take-home essay (worth 10% of the final grade, or 40 points), a book review (worth 10% of the final grade, or 40 points), a research paper (worth 25%, or 100 points), and attendance (worth 10%, or 40 points). There are 400 possible points, and I will divide your total by four to arrive at your final grade. The assignment of final grades will be on the following scale: 100-91.5=A 77.5-79.4=C+ 91.4-89.5=A- 71-77.4=C 87.5-89.4=B+ 69.5-71=C- 81.5-87.4= B 68.5-69.4=D+ 79.5-81.4=B- 61-68.4=D I hope there won’t be any grades below this. I suppose that I would give a D- if you achieved a 59.5-60.9% in the course. Below 59.4 is failing. Missing a test will drop you over a letter grade, because the highest you can achieve in the course would be 85; failing to turn in the book review will drop you a letter grade. If you do not turn in the research paper you will fail the course, since the best grade you could achieve by getting every other point in the course is 70% or a C-. Failing to attend class can hurt your final grade a lot too. Tests The format of the examinations will be as follows: 10 slide identifications (worth 40 points, or 4 points each), four short answers selected from seven possibilities (worth 20 points, or 5 points each). The slide identifications will be chosen from the illustrations in your text. The images that you need to know for each test are illustrated in image files attached to my home page at the CSUB web site (http://www.csubak.edu/art/sstone.html). Makeup examinations are not given unless the student can prove a hardship that prevented attendance on the scheduled day of the test.Art 384 Page 2 Papers Each student will research an important topic in Renaissance art, either the career of an important artist or architect, or a thematic topic. This will result in a paper of approximately 8-10 pages in length. As part of the research, each student will write a 3-4 page book review of an important source for the research paper. Papers, whether book review or research, turned in late will be docked one-third of a grade per day late (i.e. B to a B- to a C+ etc.) unless the student makes prior arrangements with the instructor. Students are requested to turn in a one-page prospectus to the instructor on February 5, indicating the topic of the student’s paper, and the book to be read for the book review (which means you should check that book out of the library or otherwise procure it by that date). The prospectus should be in printed format. Students who hand this in as requested on the scheduled date will receive five points of extra credit!!! If you are unable to attend class on the day scheduled to turn in the book review (March 3), or the paper (March 12). the instructor has a mail box in Dorothy Donohue Hall. Attendance As mentioned above, 10% of a student’s grade is based on attendance at scheduled classes. This does not count test dates; it is assumed that you will show up for the tests. Since there are two of these (not counting the last one, which is at the time when the final is scheduled), there are 18 remaining class meetings during the quarter.I don’t take attendance on the first day of class, so seventeen classes are left. I will allow each student to miss four classes unpenalized, leaving 13 classes. You will receive three (3) points for each of these classes you attend,and, if you attend at least thirteen, I will throw in a point, for a total possible of 40 points. At the beginning of class an attendance sheet will be passed out for each student in attendance to sign. This will be collected by the instructor. If you show up late, it is your responsibility to approach the instructor apologetically at the break, and ask to sign the daily roster. Please note that exceptions will be allowed in exceptional cases (i.e. severe illness, maneuvers, etc.). It is assumed that life’s occasional eccentricities (like “car trouble,” the flu) are covered by the four absences allowed. Reading The required text for this course is L.S. Adams, Italian Renaissance Art, second edition (2013). Students are strongly advised to purchase their own copy of this book, since they are responsible for the content (tested in various ways) and for the illustrations in the text (from which the slide identifications on the tests will be chosen). In addition, a chapter in B. Cole, The Renaissance Artist at Work (1983) will be read. A pdf of this chapter is available in the on-line reserves for the course at the library’s website. Class Comportment It is assumed by the instructor that students who attend the scheduled classes are there to learn the material. This means that the student will remain attentive and quiet (unless called upon to speak)). The student should stay in his or her seat, unless under severe duress, until the daily


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