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HARVARD GOV 1780 - International Political Economy

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Government E-1780 Fall 2009 Jeff Frieden International Political Economy Most readings on this list are required and are contained in the following books, which are available for purchase at the Coop: Jeffry Frieden and David Lake, Editors, International Political Economy: Perspectives on Global Power and Wealth Fourth edition (New York: St. Martin's Press, 2000). Thomas Oatley, International Political Economy: Interests and Institutions in the Global Economy fourth edition (New York: Pearson Longman, 2010) Remaining required readings will be available on the course website through electronic reserves. These readings are marked with an asterisk. The required texts are also on reserve at Grossman Library. The following books may be useful, and are available at the Coop: Graham Bannock, R.E. Baxter, and Evan Davis, The Penguin Dictionary of Economics seventh edition (New York: Penguin, 2003) Randy Charles Epping, A Beginner’s Guide to the World Economy third edition (New York: Vintage, 2001) Please note: Given the nature of the course and of the examinations, you are strongly urged to do all reading in advance, as assigned on the reading list. Failure to do so will impede your ability to profit from the lectures, and to perform well in section participation and on the examinations. Notice that the quantity of readings varies from topic to topic. You are strongly urged to read ahead when the reading load is lighter.Requirements for the course are as follows: Requirements for the course are as follows: Two take-home essays. These are papers of 2500-3000 words (seven to ten pages) each, in which you are asked to discuss issues raised by lectures and readings. They are due at the start of class five days after paper topics are assigned. The first topic is handed out October 21, and the paper is due October 26. The second topic is handed out November 18, and the paper is due November 23. For both assignments you are asked to answer one of two questions. Each essay counts for 30 percent of your final grade. An in-class midterm examination, on November 9. This asks asks you to identify and discuss the significance of important events, processes, and concepts contained in the course. The midterm exam counts as 15 percent of the final grade. A three-hour final examination. This has two parts, each of which counts for one-half of the final exam grade. The first part is made up of identification and discussion questions as on the midterm. The second part consists of an essay question, similar to the take-home examination questions. You are asked to answer one of two questions. The final examination counts for 25 percent of your final course grade. Information for students taking this course through the Division of Continuing Education – Distance Learning. There will be on-site sections for those students in the Boston area. On-line consultation with teaching assistants, and possibly on-line section “meetings,” will be arranged. Students enrolled in a DCE graduate program are also expected to write a short research paper in addition to all requirements above. Details of the paper will be discussed once class begins; all topics must be approved by your teaching assistant. Proctoring of exams, and all other logistics, will be as mandated by normal DCE procedures. Professor Frieden’s coordinates: 1737 Cambridge Street, Room K211 telephone 496-2386 email [email protected] Office Hours: Tuesdays 10-11:30 and 2-3:30. Sign up for office hours at http://tinyurl.com/3frmmbCourse Outline and Reading Assignments September 2 Introduction: Markets and Politics Oatley, chapter 1 Frieden and Lake, pp. 1-16: Frieden and Lake, “Introduction: International Politics and International Economics,” pp. 1-16 September 9 and 14 The Rise of the Modern World Economy, 1500-1914 Frieden and Lake, pp. 69-108 and 199-244: Frieden and Lake, “Historical Perspectives,” pp. 69-71. Charles Kindleberger, "The Rise of Free Trade in Western Europe," pp. 73-89 Peter Gourevitch, "International Trade, Domestic Coalitions, and Liberty: Comparative Responses to the Crisis of 1873-1896," pp. 90-108 Lawrence Broz, “The Domestic Politics of International Monetary Order: The Gold Standard,” 199-219 Barry Eichengreen, "Hegemonic Stability Theories of the International Monetary System," pp. 220-244 *Cheryl Schonhardt-Bailey, Free Trade: The Repeal of the CornLaws, ed. (England: Thoemmes Press, 1996), “Introduction,” pages xi-xxvii September 16, 21, 23, and 28 Perspectives on the International Political Economy Frieden and Lake, pp. 17-68: Frieden and Lake, “Contending Perspectives,” p. 17 Stephen Krasner, "State Power and the Structure of International Trade," pp. 19-36 Barry Eichengreen, "The Political Economy of the Smoot-Hawley Tariff," pp. 37-46 Douglass North, "Institutions and Economic Growth: A Historical Introduction," pp. 47-59 Susan Strange, "States, Firms, and Diplomacy," pp. 60-68 *Stanley Engerman and Kenneth Sokoloff, “History Lessons: Institutions, Factor Endowments, and Paths of Development in the New World,” Journal of Economic Perspectives. Vol. 14 No.3 (2000), 217-232.*Jeffrey Frankel, “Globalization of the Economy,” in Governance in a Globalizing World, edited by Joseph Nye and John Donahue (Washington: Brookings Institution Press, 2000), pages 45-70. September 30 and October 5 Origins and Overview of the Contemporary International Economic Order Frieden and Lake, pp. 127-140: David A. Lake, "British and American Hegemony Compared: Lessons for the Current Era of Decline," pp. 127-140 October 12 Columbus Day – No class October 7, 14, and 19 International Trade and its Effects Oatley, chapters 2, 3, 4 and 5 Frieden and Lake, pp. 299-376, and 19-46 (review) Frieden and Lake, “Trade,” pp. 299-302 Cletus C. Coughlin, K. Alec Chrystal, and Geoffrey E. Wood, "Protectionist Trade Policies: A Survey of Theory, Evidence, and Rationale," pp. 303-317 Ron Rogowski, "Commerce and Coalitions: How Trade Affects Domestic Political Alignments," pp. 318-326 James E. Alt and Michael Gilligan, "The Political Economy of Trading States: Factor Specificity, Collective Action Problems, and Domestic Political Institutions," pp. 327-342 Richard B. Freeman, "Are Your Wages Set in Beijing?" pp. 343-352 Edward D. Mansfield and Marc L. Busch, "The Political Economy of Nontariff


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