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ACC MATH 1324 - MATH 1324 Syllabus

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Incomplete Grade PolicyCourse-Specific Support ServicesSometimes sections of MATH 0161 MATH FOR BUS & ECO LAB (1-0-2) are offered. The lab is designed for students currently registered in Math for Business and Economics, MATH 1324. It offers individualized and group setting to provide additional practice and explanation. This course is not for college-level credit. Repeatable up to two credit hours. Students should check the course schedule for possible offerings of the lab class.Statement on Students with DisabilitiesStatement on Scholastic Dishonesty PenaltyStatement on Academic Freedom137Mathematics for Business and EconomicsFirst Day Handout for Students[Semester]MATH 1324- [section number] [Instructor Name]Synonym: [insert] [Instructor ACC Phone][Time], [Campus] [Room] [Instructor email][Instructor web page, if applicable][Instructor Office]Office Hours: [day, time]Other hours by appointmentCOURSE DESCRIPTIONMATH 1324 MATHEMATICS FOR BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (3-3-0) A course in finite mathematics for business students including sets, basic algebraic properties, linear equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, the exponential and logarithmic functions, the mathematics of finance, systems of linear equations and matrices, linear inequalities and linear programming, the simplex method, and an introduction to probability. Prerequisites: MATD 0390 or satisfactory score on the ACC Assessment Test. Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 1324 or BUA 2103. (MTH 1643) REQUIRED TEXTS/MATERIALSThe required textbook for this course is:Finite Mathematics, by Barnett, Ziegler, and Byleen 12th ed. (Prentice-Hall) ISBN 321614011,Text including MyMath Lab ISBN 321709039 Other materials include:- Scientific Calculator that handles exponents, logarithms and simple probability and statistics. Most ACC faculty are familiar with the TI family of graphing calculators. Hence, TI calculators are highly recommended for student use. Other calculator brands can also be used. Your instructor will determine the extent of calculator use in your class section. INSTRUCTIONAL METHODOLOGYThis course is taught in the classroom primarily as a lecture/discussion course. COURSE RATIONALEThis course is required in certain degree plans, such as Accounting, Computer Information Systems and Economics. For some students, this is the first half of a two-semester finite mathematics/business calculus sequence. This is also a preparation course prior to taking two semesters of business calculus, although the preferred preparation for two semesters of business calculus is MATH 1314. Finally, some students take this course as a general mathematics elective. NOTE TO STUDENTSA steady pace must be maintained throughout the semester in order to complete all required topics in a thorough manner. Students experiencing a great deal of difficulty in Sections 1.2and 2.1 through 2.3 should review (on their own) Appendices A or should consider taking MATD 0390 (Intermediate Algebra) before returning to this course. Students who discover difficulty during the first class of the semester should consider changing their registration during late registration to MATD 0390. Students who remain in the course but need additional assistance should consider registering for the supplemental lab course (MATH 0161). Students also have access to walk-in tutoring at the Learning Lab.138COMMON COURSE OBJECTIVESMathematics for Business and Economics has five main mathematical topics: functions, matrices, linear programming, probability and statistics. The objectives of the course are for students not only to know the mathematics of these concepts, but also to be able to apply the concepts to analyze and interpret information in business and financial application problems.1. Identify the basic graphs and properties of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Apply the knowledge of functions to business applications such as simple, compound or continuous compound interest, ordinary annuities, finding the maximum or minimum for quantities which are quadratic functions, and finding break even points.2. Perform basic operations with matrices, and use matrix methods to solve systems of linear equations. Apply the knowledge of matrices to business problems such as inventory, production, and total cost.3. Use geometric method to solve linear programming problems. Interpret information as an objective function with constraints, set up the linear programming problem, solve the problem and interpret the result in the context of the problem. 4. Use basic counting techniques and calculate probabilities, including conditional probabilities. Apply the mathematical knowledge of probability to business problems and interpret the results.5. Calculate measures of central tendency and measures of dispersion. Apply the mathematical skills to problems in various business settings and interpret the results. COURSE EVALUATION/GRADING SCHEMEGrading criteria must be clearly explained in the syllabus. The criteria should specify the numberof exams and other graded material (homework, assignments, projects, etc.). Guidelines for othergraded materials, such as homework or projects, should also be included. COURSE POLICIESThe syllabus should contain the following policies of the instructor: - missed exam policy---policy about late work (if applicable)- class participation expectations- reinstatement policy (if applicable) Attendance Policy (if no attendance policy, students must be told that). Math Dept's attendance policy follows. Instructors who have a different policy are required to state it. "Attendance is required in this course. Students who miss more than 4 classes may be withdrawn." Withdrawal Policy (including the withdrawal deadline for the semester)139 It is the student's responsibility to initiate all withdrawals in this course. The instructor may withdraw students for excessive absences (4) but makes no commitment to do this for the student.After the withdrawal date, neither the student nor the instructor may initiate a withdrawal.Incomplete Grade PolicyIncomplete grades (I) will be given only in very rare circumstances. Generally, to receive a gradeof "I", a student must have taken all examinations, be passing, and after the last date to withdraw, have a personal tragedy occur which prevents course completion.Course-Specific Support Services Sometimes sections of MATH 0161


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