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JMU POSC 353 - POSC36105Adams

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Course ObjectivesCourse RequirementsImportant Dates and DeadlinesCourse EvaluationAcademic HonestyOffice HoursSpecial NeedsIf you are a student with a documented disability, who will be requesting accommodations in my class, please make sure you are registered with the Office of Disability Services, Wilson Hall, Room 107, 568-6705. Please provide me with an Access Plan letter outlining your accommodations. I will be glad to meet with you privately during my office hours to discuss your special needs.Course OutlineIntroduction to the Course (January 11)I. The Colonial State and its LegacyThe African Colonial State (January 18, 20)The Rise of Nationalism, Decolonization, and Colonial Legacies (January 25, 27)Map Quiz: Tuesday, January 25II. Constructing a Post-Colonial PolityThe Post-Colonial State and the Rise of Neo-Patrimonial Rule (February 1, 3)The Rise and Decline of the “Integral State” (February 8, 10)Political Parties and the Military (February 15, 17)Joseph, Richard. 2003. “Africa: States in Crisis.” Journal of Democracy 14 (3): 159-170.Mid-term: Thursday, March 3III. Cultural Pluralism and the Politics of IdentityRecommended:Young, Crawford. 1993. “The Dialectics of Cultural Pluralism: Concept and Reality.” In Younged. The Rising Tide of Cultural Pluralism: The Nation-State at Bay?” Madison: The University of Wisconsin Press, 3-35.Vail, Leroy. The Creation of Tribalism in Southern Africa.IV. Economic Crisis and ReformV. Political Crisis and Reform: Political Changes in the 1990sJournal of Modern African Studies. 37 (1): 137-169.*Alence, Rod. “South Africa after Apartheid: The First Decade.” Journal of Democracy. 15 (3):78-91.POSC 361: AFRICAN POLITICSSPRING 2005Tu, Th 2:00-3:15 PMG1 MauryDr. AdamsOffice: 216 Maury Email:[email protected] Hrs: Tu and Th 3:30-4:30, Telephone: 568-3377W 9-12, and by appointmentCOURSE OBJECTIVESThe central goal of the course is to foster an understanding of contemporary politics in Africa. The course is organized thematically and draws on case studies to develop these themes. It provides an overview of the central factors affecting African politics, such as the state, societal groups, ethnic, religious, class, and gender identities, international financial institutions, and other global and domestic forces. Students should emerge from the course with concrete knowledge of African politics in particular countries as well as with a greater understanding of the theories and broader analytical debates that animate research on Africa.Students are expected to integrate a broad array of materials, including lectures, readings, current events, and films, to come to a deeper understanding of contemporary African politics. COURSE REQUIREMENTSClass attendance and participation: Class attendance and participation are important components of the course. The exams draw heavily on lectures and class discussions and cannot be adequately completed without regular attendance. Attendance will be taken at class meetings. In a small, upper-level course such as this one, participation is essential. I expect students to come to class having read and thought about the day’s assigned readings and ready to contribute to discussion. Please note that both attendance and participation are factored into final grades. Reading: Students are expected to read assigned material and to come to class prepared to participate actively in discussions. The reading is intended to supplement rather than simply repeat the material covered in class. The following texts are required for the course and are available for purchase at the bookstore:Achebe, Chinua. 1989. Anthills of the Savannah. New York: Anchor Books.Chazan, Naomi, Peter Lewis, Robert A. Mortimer, Donald Rothchild, and Stephen John Stedman. 1999. Politics and Society in Contemporary Africa. 3rd edition. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers. 1Gourevitch, Philip. 1998. We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will be Killed With Our Families: Stories from Rwanda. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux.Villalón, Leonardo and Phillip Huxtable. 1998. The African State at a Critical Juncture: Between Disintegration and Reconfiguration. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers.In addition, many required readings are available online on the course Blackboard site. The on-line readings are marked with an asterisk (*) in the course outline. Beyond the required readings for the course, it is expected that you will follow current events related to African politics. Over the course of the semester, you will be responsible for posting articles on Blackboard and presenting them to the class. There are a number of excellent news sources available on the web. I have listed some relevant links below.All Africa http://www.allafrica.comAfrica Online http://www.africanews.orgBBC Network Africa http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/networkafrica/ The Mail and Guardian http://www.mg.co.za The New York Times http://www.nytimes.comThe Washington Post http://www.washingtonpost.comThe Christian Science Monitor http://csmonitor.comThe Economist http://www.economist.comPapers: Over the course of the semester, students must write four (4) response papers. Specific due dates are listed on the course outline. The papers should not exceed two pages in length. Each response paper should have two sections. In the first (two- to four-sentence) section, you should summarize the main argument of the author/s read for that class day. In the second (longer) section, you should react to the author/s’ claims. This section should be analytical and may take one of many forms, including:- Comparison of the current author’s argument with arguments made by other authors or with insights raised in previous class discussions - Criticism of the current author (i.e., demonstration that the author’s evidence does not support his/her conclusions)- Extrapolation of the current author’s insights (i.e., suggesting that the author’s insights shed light on current events, or that current events disprove the author’s insights)Response papers should by typed and double-spaced. You should use twelve-point font and one-inch margins. No extensions will be granted.In addition, students will be required to write a short (8-10 page) research paper. Students may write on any subject relevant to the course, although topics must be approved by the instructor. A one-page proposal with preliminary bibliography is due in-class on Tuesday, February 15.


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