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Grid Systems

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DTP-GRID SYSTEMSINDESIGN LEVEL 1Electronic Publishing 1INDESIGN LEVEL 1Grid Systems• Grid systems in Graphic DesignG id i f i t ti th t t –Grids are a series of intersecting axes that create horizontal and vertical divisions of space on a page– Grids allow the placement and interaction of visual elements creating movement across a layoutlayout– Grids can be simple, complex- all depending on the content– Grids are not meant to be restrictive, they can be modified to fit contentLa o t Workbook pages 5455Electronic Publishing 2–Layout Workbook, pages 54-55Grid Systems• Functions of a grid– Control– Organization–Rhythm–Harmony– Unity– Dynamism–ReadibilityReadibility– Movement– BalanceDi i–Direction–Contrast–InteractionElectronic Publishing 3–Order»Layout Workbook, pages 54-55Grid Systems• Elements of a GridCl–Columns– Gutter widths (Column Intervals)–Flowlines (Rows)Flowlines (Rows)– Grid Modules–Marginsg– Layout Workbook, page 56Electronic Publishing 4Elements of a Grid• MarginsDefine the active area of a page and direct the –Define the active area of a page and direct the viewer toward the visual elements– Margins may vary in size depending on format as ll t twell as content– Folios and footers may be placed in the margins–Margins are not intended to trap content, they Margins are not intended to trap content, they are instead used to activate the positive spaces in a layout–For layouts with large amounts of text (books) –For layouts with large amounts of text (books), large margins are ideal as they provide breathing spaceLayout Workbook page 56Electronic Publishing 5–Layout Workbook, page 56Elements of a Grid• ColumnsV ti l di i i f d t li i l –Vertical divisions of space used to align visual elements• Single, multiple columns can be used or interchanged• The quantity and complexity of information determines columns » Layout Workbook, page 58y,pgElectronic Publishing 6Elements of a Grid• Gutter Width (Column intervals)Al k C l I t l ti –Also known as Column Intervals, negative spaces that separate one column from the next and prevent text and images from clashing– Layout Workbook, page 58Electronic Publishing 7Elements of a Grid• Flowlines (Rows)S t f ti l l b di idi th –Support for vertical columns by dividing the page into horizontal intervals to provide additional alignment points across a grid. Wonderful tools to achieve consistency in a layout– Dictate the horizontal positions of a visual elements and how they rise or fall along columnselements and how they rise or fall along columns– Layout Workbook, page 59Electronic Publishing 8Elements of a Grid• Grid ModulesS td b l d i –Spaces created by columns, rows, and margins that support text and visuals. Content will determine the amount of active modules.– Modules can be used for consistency– It is OK to leave modules empty, as negative t bl d ispace, to balance designs–Layout Workbook, page 59Layout Workbook, page 59Electronic Publishing 9Elements of a GridElectronic Publishing 10Types of Grids• Single Column GridBi t t l t G t f ti –Basic structural system. Great for presenting large amounts of text (books)–Margins are the one consideration of a single Margins are the one consideration of a single column grid– Layout Workbook, page 63Electronic Publishing 11Types of Grids• Single Column GridElectronic Publishing 12Types of Grids• Multiple Column GridsC t i lti l ti l i t l–Contain multiple spatial intervals– Very flexible grids allowing for a range of visual elementselements– Great for complex projects like magazines, newspapers, and publications with diverse ttcontent– Rhythm, movement, and tension can be developed through the interaction of visual developed through the interaction of visual elements in multiple column grids– Layout Workbook, page 64Electronic Publishing 13Types of Grids• Multiple Column GridsElectronic Publishing 14Types of Grids• Modular GridsA t i f ltill id ith th –An extension of multiple-column grids with the addition of horizontal rows (flowlines)–Modules are the active areas of a page that Modules are the active areas of a page that accommodate visual elements– Great for complex publications like catalogs, i tmagazines, etc– Layout Workbook, page 66Electronic Publishing 15Types of Grids• Modular GridsElectronic Publishing 16Types of Grids• Alternative GridsL d i–Loose and organic– Rely heavily on “intuitive” placement–Most alternative grids rely on a dominant visual Most alternative grids rely on a dominant visual element, focal point, to help align other elements– Develop spatial relationships through thePush and Pull technique–Layout Workbook, page 68Layout Workbook, page 68Electronic Publishing 17Types of Grids• Alternative GridsElectronic Publishing 18Types of Grids• Breaking the GridG id t t b id t t t b –Grids are meant to be a guide, not meant to be an absolute unbreakable rule–Grids are meant as a starting point, a foundation Grids are meant as a starting point, a foundation that is to be built upon– To provide emphasis, break monotony, designers d t b k th id h d dare urged to break the grid wherever needed–Layout Workbook, page 68Layout Workbook, page 68Electronic Publishing


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