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MCCCD HIS 105 - Syllabus

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1ARIZONA HISTORY Fall 2008 History 105 (Honors) Section 1810 Class Hours: MWF 10:00-10:50A Location: B-108 Instructor: Mike Steinberg How to contact me (in order of preference): 1. Home # 623-582-0528 (leave message; I will call you back) 2. Social Science Department # 623-845-3685 (leave message with Bridgida) 3. Home Website: [email protected] 4. Office Hours: By appointment Course Description This course will cover the prehistoric and contemporary Native American experience, Spanish colonial times, the Mexican National period, the U.S. federal territorial years, and Arizona’s political and economic development during the twentieth century. Prerequisites: None. Honors Note: Students in honors classes are encouraged to assume a greater responsibility for their own learning and to express and defend their ideas. Students may be asked to contribute to the design of course assignments to reflect their own specific interests within the discipline. Required Books: Sheridan, Thomas E., Arizona: A History. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1995. Turner, Nancy E., These Is My Words: The Diary of Sarah Agnes Prine, 1881-1901, Arizona Territories. New York: Regan Books, HarperCollins Publishers, 1999. Webb, George, A Pima Remembers. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1959. Course Competencies: 1. Review the physiography, principle rivers, flora, fauna, and climatic changes characteristic of Arizona. 2. Describe the prehistoric cultures of Arizona and the origins of contemporary Native Americans. 3. Describe the Spanish years in Arizona and the significance of the early Spanish explorations and expeditions into Arizona. 4. Describe the establishment in Arizona of missions, presidios, and towns by the Spanish; and their introduction of essential industry. 5. Describe the increased interest in the Southwest in the early nineteenth century, and the significance of the arrival of the early pathfinders in Arizona.26. Describe the significance to Arizona of the war against Mexico in 1846, the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, and the Gadsden Purchase. 7. Describe the creation of Arizona routes to California and the military topographical missions that opened and secured the roads. 8. Describe the development of transportation in Arizona, and the introduction of mule trains, camel caravans, stagecoaches, and steamboats on the Colorado. 9. Describe the effects of the American Civil War on Arizona during the Confederate presence, and reoccupation by Union forces. 10. Describe the significant political and economic features of Arizona as a federal territory. 11. Describe government Indian policy in Arizona and the Apache’s uprising of the 1870s. 12. Describe the growth of the Arizona territory resulting from generous land policy extended to settlers. 13. Describe modern Arizona in the aftermath of the construction of Roosevelt Dam and on the subsequent Salt River dams. 14. Describe the success of the Salt River Project and Central Arizona Project in laying the foundations for the vast growth of contemporary Phoenix and the state in general. Course Requirements: Quiz: 50 points There will be an essay/multiple choice quiz on prehistoric cultures and native peoples (Weeks 1-3). Exams: 300 points There will be three closed book exams including a comprehensive final exam. Each exam will be worth 100 points. One essay from exams #1 and 2 will be completed at home. Before each exam, I will give you study questions. The exams will consist of: 1. Choice of two (2) essay questions (35 points each; total 70 points) 2. Choice of two (2) identification terms (5 points each; total 10 points) 3. Twenty (20) multiple choice items (1 point each; total 20 points) MAKE-UP TESTS WILL BE ALLOWED ONLY IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY! Students must contact the instructor no later than the day of the test. Exam Preparation: 1. Examinations will be drawn heavily from lectures which are supplemented by readings. I will not ask you anything on an exam that has not been discussed in class! If you are absent you will be missing valuable course content. 2. It is important that students take complete notes and advisable to read assignments closely to familiarize yourself with the material and to connect the readings with the lectures. 3. Taping of class lectures is not permitted. 4. The instructor recommends that students use the resources (e.g. tutors/videos/study guides) provided by the Center for Learning (#623-845-3810) when needed.3Cheating Anyone caught cheating (including plagiarizing) will be subject to any or all of the following: a zero for the work involved; an immediate “F” in the course; referral to the campus Academic Standards Committee for possible further discipline, including expulsion. (See Student Handbook, pp. 330-331). Reports-40 points Short written and oral reports will be presented on: 1. A topic provided by the instructor-10 points (see page 8) 2. An issue selected by the student-30 points (see pages 9-10) Honors Note: All written work completed by honors students will be graded with an emphasis on depth and thoroughness of understanding. Attendance and Participation (30 points) Students are expected to participate in class activities and discussion. Up to thirty (30) points will be awarded for your contribution to the class. Attendance Policy 1. Each student is responsible for the information and materials presented every class day unless excused for official absences (see Student Handbook, pp. 46-47). Please call the instructor immediately if you will not be attending a class so your absence can be excused. 2. EXCESSIVE ABSENCES and ARRIVING LATE for class will cause points to be deducted. As a rule, two (2) points will be deducted for each unexcused absence after three (3) absences. 3. A student who has missed more classes than the number of times a class meets per week will need to meet with the instructor to discuss why he/she should not be withdrawn from the class. Extra Credit Each student may select extra work assignments worth up to 35 points. See pages 10-11 for details. Grade Breakdown: Quiz: 50 points A-378-420 Exams: 300 points B-336-377 Reports: 40 points C-294-335 Attendance and Participation: 30 points D-252-293 Total: 420 points F-below 252 Extra Credit: maximum, 35 points4 Requests: 1. Please


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