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Learning Styles

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Learning StylesLearning Styles: TopicsBackgroundSlide 4Slide 5Slide 6Learning Style ModelsKolb’s Learning StyleSlide 9Slide 10Slide 11Slide 12Felder-SilvermanSlide 14Slide 15Slide 16Slide 17Slide 18Myers-BriggsSlide 20Slide 21Slide 22Slide 23Teaching to All TypesSlide 25Slide 26Slide 27ReferencesGateway Engineering Education Coalition 1Learning StylesAn Introduction to the Ways People LearnGateway Engineering Education Coalition 2Learning Styles: TopicsBackgroundLearning Style ModelsTeaching to All TypesReferencesGateway Engineering Education Coalition 3BackgroundStudents have different “learning styles” Learning styles describe how students prefer to and are best able to receive and process informationGateway Engineering Education Coalition 4BackgroundLearning styles indicate preferences for:Facts and dataTheories and modelsVisual presentation – pictures and diagramsVerbal presentation – written and spokenActive and interactive learningIntrospective and individual learningGateway Engineering Education Coalition 5BackgroundTeaching solely in a manner not well suited to a student’s learning style may cause enough discomfort to interfere with learningGateway Engineering Education Coalition 6BackgroundHowever…Teaching only to the preferred modes may result in students lacking the mental agility to reach their potential academically and professionallyIn other words…they might not adapt wellGateway Engineering Education Coalition 7Learning Style ModelsThree common learning styles models include:Kolb’s Learning Style ModelFelder-Silverman Learning Style ModelMyers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI)Gateway Engineering Education Coalition 8Kolb’s Learning StyleType 1 – Concrete, ReflectiveType 2 – Abstract, ReflectiveType 3 – Abstract, ActiveType 4 – Concrete, ActiveGateway Engineering Education Coalition 9Kolb’s Learning StyleType 1 – Concrete, ReflectiveTypically asks “Why?”Responds well to explanations of how course material relates to their experience, their interests, and their future careersTo be successful with Type 1, the instructor should motivateGateway Engineering Education Coalition 10Kolb’s Learning StyleType 2 – Abstract, ReflectiveTypically asks “What?”Responds well to information that is presented in an organized, logical fashion and benefits from reflectionInstructor should function as an expertGateway Engineering Education Coalition 11Kolb’s Learning StyleType 3 – Abstract, ActiveTypically asks “How?”Responds well to working actively on well-defined tasks and by trial-and-error in an environment that allows them to fail safelyInstructor should function as a coach by providing guided practice and feedback.Gateway Engineering Education Coalition 12Kolb’s Learning StyleType 4 – Concrete, ActiveTypically asks “What if?”Prefers to apply course material in new situations to solve real problems.Instructor should stay out of the way to let students discover things on their own.Gateway Engineering Education Coalition 13Felder-SilvermanSensing/IntuitiveVisual/VerbalInductive/DeductiveActive/ReflectiveSequential/GlobalGateway Engineering Education Coalition 14Felder-SilvermanSensingConcrete, PracticalOriented toward facts and proceduresIntuitiveConceptual, InnovativeOriented toward theories and meaningsGateway Engineering Education Coalition 15Felder-SilvermanVisualPrefer visual representations of materialPictures, Diagrams, Flow chartsVerbalPrefer written and spoken explanationsGateway Engineering Education Coalition 16Felder-SilvermanInductivePrefer presentations that proceed from the specific to the generalDeductivePrefer presentations that go from general to the specificGateway Engineering Education Coalition 17Felder-SilvermanActiveLearn by trying things outPrefer working with othersReflectiveLearn by thinking things throughPrefer working aloneGateway Engineering Education Coalition 18Felder-SilvermanSequentialLinear, OrderlyLearn in small incremental stepsGlobalHolistic, Systems thinkersLearn in large leapsGateway Engineering Education Coalition 19Myers-BriggsExtraverts/IntrovertsSensors/IntuitorsThinkers/FeelersJudgers/PerceiversGateway Engineering Education Coalition 20Myers-BriggsExtravertsLike to try things outFocus on the outer world of peopleIntrovertsThink things throughFocus on the inner world of ideasGateway Engineering Education Coalition 21Myers-BriggsSensorsPracticalDetail-orientedFocus on facts and proceduresIntuitorsImaginativeConcept-orientedFocus on meanings and possibilitiesGateway Engineering Education Coalition 22Myers-BriggsThinkersSkepticalTend to make decisions based on logic and rulesFeelersAppreciativeTend to make decisions based on personal and humanistic considerationsGateway Engineering Education Coalition 23Myers-BriggsJudgersSet and follow agendasSeek closure even with incomplete dataPerceiversAdapt to changing circumstancesResist closure to obtain more dataGateway Engineering Education Coalition 24Teaching to All TypesAppealing to a wide array of learning styles can be achieved, based on the Felder-Silverman model, by:Gateway Engineering Education Coalition 25Teaching to All TypesUsing plots, graphics, and demonstrations along with oral and written explanations (visual/verbal)Balancing concrete information such as experimental results with conceptual information like theories and models (sensing/intuitive)Gateway Engineering Education Coalition 26Teaching to All TypesDemonstrating the logical flow of material but also making connections to other classes, topics, and everyday experiences (sequential/global)Encouraging or requiring cooperative learning (all learning styles)Gateway Engineering Education Coalition 27Teaching to All TypesAsking students to explain a general principle given only experimental observations (inductive)Providing in class time for students to consider the material presented as well as for active participation (reflective/active)Gateway Engineering Education Coalition 28ReferencesMatters of Style, Felder, Richard, ASEE Prism, 6(4), 18-23, December


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