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SC EDTE 781 - EDTE 781 Syllabus

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EDTE 781: Advanced Field Study of Teaching I. Descriptive Information A. Course Number and Title: EDTE 781: Advanced Field Study of Teaching B. Catalog Description: Students will conduct and disseminate a field study of a selected instructional innovation as specified by an implementation plan in EDTE 780. C. Course Credit: 6 semester graduate hours D. Prerequisites: Participation in SCRI professional development E. Intended Audience: SCRI Phase Three Literacy Coaches F. Instructor: Dr. Heidi Mills, [email protected] Wardlaw 103, 777-4265 II. Statement of Course Goals and Objectives A. Course Goals: To increase teachers' ability: 1. to participate in instructional development and innovation 2. to reflect on and adjust teaching approaches 3. to disseminate educational recommendations B. Course Objectives: At the conclusion of the course, the student should be able to: 1. implement an instructional plan which provides development in a designated dimension of teaching; 2. create administrative and environmental conditions in a field setting to support effective implementation of the plan;. 3. identify needed revisions in instructional delivery and evaluation procedures and make appropriate adjustments; 4. make appropriate instructional and staff development recommendations based on interpretations of the field study; 5. analyze audio and video tapes of teaching interactions in light of planned instructional approaches; 6. prepare a written description of the implemented field study, including interpretations of the results; and 7. present results of the field study and discuss implications for other educational settings.III. Required Texts and Readings Books and articles provided by State Department of Education. Required texts: Hubbard, R. and Power, B. 1993. The Art of Classroom Inquiry: A Handbook for Teacher Researchers. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Power, B. 1996. Taking Note: Improving Your Observational Notetaking. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Hubbard, R. and Power, R. 1999. Living the Questions: A Guide for Teacher Researchers. York, Maine: Stenhouse. Lindfors, J. 1999. Children’s Inquiry: Using Language to Make Sense of the World. New York, NY: Teachers College Press. Johnston, P. 2004. Choice Words: How Our Language Affects Children’s Learning. Portland, Maine: Stenhouse Publishers. Selected articles from Braunger, J. and Lewis, J. 1997. Building a Knowledge Base in Reading. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. IV. Academic Course Requirements and Candidate Performances A. Maintain A Writer's Notebook Michael Halliday helped us to understand that we learn language as we use language for a variety of functions. In this way, authors often use Writer's Notebooks to: • document wondrous words and powerful phrases • document inspirational phrases • remember delightful and informative stories • capture personal insights through sketches, models, photos, and written narratives • jot down descriptions of life around them SCREADS coaches will keep a Writer's Notebook to help each other better understand how to think, work, and communicate. Your Writer's Notebook should be a place for you to record ideas, thoughts, language, and connections as you work to make sense of your life as facilitator, teacher, and coach. It should enrich your personal life by helping you capture critical incidents, slow down and look closely and, through your own writing, uncover what matters to you. B. Systematic Reflection on Readings In order to develop habits of intentional and consistent reflective reading, each participantshould read selected professional books and articles, experiment with and develop a system to keep track of readings and to record and build on reactions to readings, e.g. note taking, underling, responding in the margins, etc. When learners use writing to intentionally and systematically reflect upon reading experiences they: • Make new connections; • Articulate their beliefs about language, literacy, and learning; • Make solid predictions and pose new questions; • Theorize from descriptions of exemplary practice and • Imagine practices that reflect current theory. • C. Field Study Project: Implementation of Curriculum Inquiry Project As SCREADS coaches, you will implement the inquiry proposal you developed in EDTE 780. You will intentionally and systematically collect, organize and analyze data throughout the year. You will bring selected samples of data to state meetings as directed by your teaching team member to receive support in data collection, analysis and writing strategies to help you develop a professional voice. You will use writing as a tool for learning throughout the year to make sense of and act on your coaching data and to tell the story of your inquiry project. While all of the curriculum inquiry projects will have unique designs based on the questions posed and nature of the inquiry, all of them will include: *Guiding question(s) and a description of how it evolved/why it was important (Ex: Wonderings, What did you want to learn to become a better coach?); *Review of related literature (Ex: Who did you read to help you? Who were your significant distant teachers?); *Description of setting, context and primary informants (Ex: Which teachers, children, administrators did you follow closely?) *Description of data collection and analysis procedures (Ex: What did you do and how did you make sense of it?) *Findings/patterns that emerged during interpretation of data (Ex: What did you learn? What’s the news? What were the big ideas that grew out of your study?)*Support for or explanation of findings with specific classroom or study group examples (Example data: vignettes from classrooms or study groups, samples of student or teacher work, classroom artifacts, excerpts of conversations/transcriptions, etc.); *Explanation of the ways responsive curricular decisions/interventions grew out of and contributed to coaching data (Ex: What did you do along the way as a result of what you were learning?); *Discussion of the impact of the experience on your learning (Ex: So what? What kind of difference did it make? Implications for teaching, learning , coaching.); *New questions that emerged in the course of the inquiry and; *References (Authors and texts that informed your work.). *Please submit two copies (one electronic – I’ll bring a flash drive and one hard copy) of your


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