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DCCCD GOVT 2301 - Syllabus

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GOVT 2301.4425 AMERICAN GOVERNMENT Winter Term 2012 Professor Glynn Newman Self-Paced December 16th – January 5th [email protected] **The platform for this class is Webcom (http://webcom.grtxle.com/transformation) not Blackboard thus we are not using ecampus. If you were enrolled in my class last semester and can prove it, then you do not need to purchase a new access code just write an email to [email protected]? Tell them what year, course and section number you were in and cc your email to me. Office Hours: online via email, all emails must have course and section number Focus and Design: This course examines the institutions and processes of the U.S. and Texas governments, introducing some of the common modes of analysis in political science. Students will be encouraged to think and write critically about the design, philosophy, and practice of democracy in the U.S. and Texas. The three major topics for the course are the founding and design, institutions, and participation. . Required Reading: Newman, G. (2010). The Transformation of American Politics Revised. Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company. Copyright: 2008 Revised 2011 Edition: 02 Number of Pages: 458 ISBN# 9780757583223 for old book and 978075792515 for new book either book is ok. Binding: Soft Cover You can order through the Eastfield Campus Bookstore. It may also be available through http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0757592511 and www.Kendallhunt.com Read the following Newspapers Online: http://www.cnn.com/POLITICS/ , http://www.foxnews.com/politics/index.html , http://www.dallasnews.com/ , http://drudgereport.com Buyer Beware: Because this book is both a textbook and workbook purchasing a used or renting a copy might create some problems. Pages missing plus access codes will interrupt your ability to access the class. Thus you will have to purchase a new book so be careful.Class Assignments and Grading: Your grades will be based on 4 examinations and participation. Pop quizzes may be used from time to time to help me assess participation. Points are distributed as follows: 1. First test Chapters 1-3 @100pts 2. Second test Chapters 4-7 @100pts 3. Third test Chapters 7-9 @100pts 4. Fourth test Chapters 10-12 @100pts 5. Evaluations/Sample Test @200pts Due January 3rd Do not be late -50pts A's will be given to anyone receiving 90 or more points, A 100-90, B 89-80, C 79-70, D 69-60 , F 59 and below. You may discuss the course or your work with me at any time. Formal grade appeals must be made in writing. However, I will regrade your entire test. Therefore, your grade can go either up or down. Notices: 1) Education requires that one fully engage challenging material. 2) Much learning is cooperative and interactive in nature. Strive to participate in class. 3) All students are responsible for maintaining the highest standards of honesty and integrity in every phase of their academic careers. The penalties for academic dishonesty are severe and ignorance is not an acceptable defense. All academic work for this course must meet the standards contained in "A Culture of Honesty." Students are responsible for informing themselves about those standards before performing any academic work. The penalties for academic dishonesty are sever , and ignorance is not an acceptable defense. 4) A course syllabus is a general plan for the course; deviations announced to the class may be necessary. 5) Make-up tests are seldom given. Given that I _ve taught well over 7000 students, stop to consider whether your _excuse _ is extraordinary. There are no make-ups for pop quizzes. 6) Laptop users should use the two front rows. All cell phones and mp3s should be turne d off. All cell phones, mp3s and newspapers should be stowed. Assignments Overview: “EVALUATIONS AND SAMPLE TEST” ASSIGNMENT The Evaluation of Ideas and Sample Test which is located inside the textbook will be submitted to the professor by snail mail during the second week of class on January 3rd in a yellow envelope with student name, course and section number. Make sure you send original pages not copies. Both Evaluations and Sample test are behind each chapter of the textbook. Mail in the assignment to the address below: Eastfield College Attn: Professor G. Newman Social Science Department G 237 3737 Motley Dr. Mesquite, Texas 75150If your work is not in G 237,by 4’Oclock it will be considered late and you will lose 50pts each day no questions about it. Policy on Missed Examinations: Missed Exams will receive a grade of zero except in cases of demonstrated, appropriate, and verifiable emergencies or tragedies or where the student has prior approval from the instructor. In cases of missed exams excused by the instructor, a makeup exam will be rescheduled at the convenience of the instructor. All exams must be completed by the last day of class. Policy on Academic: If any student is caught cheating that is sharing information or submitting work that is not of your own you risk being removed from the class and may be expelled from the academic institution depending on your hearing. Also Plagiarism will not be accepted that is claiming someone else work as your own. What you earn is what you get. Withdrawals: The last day to withdraw with a “W” is Dec 25th. It is the student's responsibility to drop a course. If you fail to drop the course a grade will be issued on work completed. See course schedule for additional information concerning withdraw policies. Writing Guides: Good academic writing is hard work. The writing guides by Booth and his colleagues and by Lasch will help you to become a better writer. Here are a few more good writing guides that most students (and more than a few professors) would do well to add to their bookshelves. They are in alphabetical order. Barzun, Jacques. 2001. Simple and Direct: A Rhetoric for Writers, 4th ed. New York: HarperCollins. Barzun, Jacques, and Henry F. Graff. 1992. The Modern Researcher, 5th ed. Forth Worth, Tex.: Harcourt Colle Follett, Wilson, and Erik Wensberg. 1998. Modern American Usage: A Guide, revised ed. New York: Hill and Wang. Frisch, Rose E., Gregory G. Colomb, Wayne C. Booth, and Joseph M. Williams. 2003. The Craft of Research, 2nd ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Turabian, Kate L.. 1996. A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Williams, Joseph


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