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Syllabus 48200 F06.pdfSyllabus 48200 F06 8-29.pdfSummer Building Study F06 Summary.pdfBuilding Study Summer 06 FINAL.pdfBuilding Study F06 Summary.pdf48200_F06_dgkenned_proj2study.pdfGallery Annex F06 Summary.pdfGallery F06 Final.pdfMuseum Annex.pdf48200_F06_cgallot_proj1annex.pdfHouse F06 Summary Doc.pdfHouse Project 3 F06.pdfHouse F06 Summary.pdfArchaeo Home.pdf48200_F06_cgallot_proj3house.pdfArchitecture, Design & Composition Studio Coordinator: Kai Gutschow Fall 2006, CMU, Arch #48-200, M/W/F 1:30-4:20 Email: [email protected] Class Website: www.andrew.cmu.edu/course/48-200 Off. Hr: M/F 12:00-1:00pm & by appt. in MM202 (8/29/06)F’06 SyllabusCOMPOSITION: “the planned arrangement of parts to form a whole."Architects compose concepts, spaces, contexts, functions, experiences,elements, materials, drawings and much more. See also: synthesis,constitution, disposition, formation, assembly. Related to “composition” inmusic, writing, film, typography, painting, and materials... CONCEPT: “A concept brings together ideas, precepts, and affects thatcreate experiential forms." See also idea, theory, meaning...CONTEXT: “the interrelated circumstances, objects, or conditions inwhich something exists or occurs,” physically and intellectually. See alsoenvironment and the connection or coherence between parts. OVERVIEW: Studio 48-200 is an introduction to architectural compositionstressing concept generation and the development of a rich designprocess to create evocative spatial experiences. This studio will start withthe premise that architecture is an art. As an art, architecture necessarilyinvolves both ideas and craft. We will work to develop meaningful ideasthat are made manifest through fundamental elements of architecture. We seek to understand compositional principles which characterize thebuildings of the past and present, and apply them with intent andsignificance in the design studio. By focusing both on challenging ideasand profound details, we seek to explore architecture’s potential forcreating poetic expressions, appropriate shelter, or exalted experiences,as well as its ability to embody ideas and impart meaning to the worldaround us. BUILDING on the 1st year studios that explored "Methods &Transformations in Form & Space," the 2nd year will investigate ingreater depth the complexity and integrated nature of the architecturalobject and design process. We will explore the artistic, conceptual,poetic, creative, and experiential side of architecture as a way ofdeveloping a rigorous process of architectural form-making. Bydeveloping methods, parameters, and alternatives of form-making we willexplore issues such as expression, perception, and representation. Eachof the five studios will approach the theme of design and compositiondifferently, but all students are expected to work together and explorecommunally a broad spectrum of design strategies at every opportunity. GOALS: Each student should develop a passion for thinking about, andmaking architecture. In 2 year studio that means focusing on Concept,ndComposition, and Context. In addition, each should work to perfect thetools and methods enabling them to engage on a high intellectual andcreative level with any scale or type of architectural design project. Thefocus is on 6 areas: 1) Passionate Attitude; 2) Verbal Acuity; 3) DrawingClarity and Power: 4) Robust Models; 5) Conceptual Clarity with Richnessof Detail; 6) Theory: Take a Stance! The personal and complex nature ofarchitectural design demands that each student take responsibility forshaping their own progress, passion, and particular approach. PROJECTS: The semester will consist of three projects. Project 1: an single-artist annex and study space adjacent to theCarnegie Museum of Art, common to all studios. Project 2: a “building analysis” project to be run simultaneously withdesign projects, unique to each studioProject 3: a small residence for one person on a natural site that is“intellectually challenging” and “experientially rich,” unique to eachstudio.Architecture, Design & Composition Studio Coordinator: Kai Gutschow Fall 2006, CMU, Arch #48-200, M/W/F 1:30-4:20 Email: [email protected] Class Website: www.andrew.cmu.edu/course/48-200 Off. Hr: M/W 12:30-1:30pm & by appt. in MM202 (7/26/06)48-200 BUILDING STUDIES - SUMMER 2006MINDSETThe goal is to build on your analysis skills from 1 year, and to help preparestyou for the upcoming 2 year “Composition” studio by expanding your exposurendto significant works of architecture. Your mission is to discover and expose theunderlying compositional intentions and resultant experiences of assignedbuildings so that they become part of a “visual library” of examples to learn from. This exercise is concerned with the HOW and WHY of architecture, leading todiscussions on “WHAT is architecture?” A successful resolution will requireintense curiosity, creative thinking, critical understanding, and above all apassion for thinking about architecture. YOUR WORK & PROCESSUsing any sources you can get a hold of, including the internet and yourlocal library, research the 4 assigned houses listed below (based on last name),as well as 1 building assigned to you on the second page, and take LOTS ofnotes in the form of sketches (avoid words) in your sketchbook. Think about, analyze, and seek to understand the design and compositionof these building “specimens.” Search for "systems" and compositional"principles" in order to discover the architectural "language," and thearrangement of important architectural elements and spaces. Investigate yourbuilding at different scales, from details and materials, to major axes andcontext. Imagine yourself walking up to and through the building, and how allof your senses would be stimulated. Sketch the architecture, diagram the major ideas, spaces, and transitions. Relate these to smaller building elements and details. Look for issues ofgeometry, structure, site, orientation, enclosure, approach, circulation, light,materials, rhythms, and all the aspects and elements of form, space, andarchitecture that you explored in the 1 year. Think about material, as well asstimmaterial issues. Seek to understand WHAT the architect intended with theoverall design and each detail, and WHY the architect “composed” it that way.ASSIGNMENT: DUE: Mon. Aug. 28, 2006 Find the best and most appropriate way of representing the


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