New version page

Adolescence

Upgrade to remove ads

This preview shows page 1-2-3-4-5 out of 14 pages.

Save
View Full Document
Premium Document
Do you want full access? Go Premium and unlock all 14 pages.
Access to all documents
Download any document
Ad free experience
Premium Document
Do you want full access? Go Premium and unlock all 14 pages.
Access to all documents
Download any document
Ad free experience
Premium Document
Do you want full access? Go Premium and unlock all 14 pages.
Access to all documents
Download any document
Ad free experience
Premium Document
Do you want full access? Go Premium and unlock all 14 pages.
Access to all documents
Download any document
Ad free experience
Premium Document
Do you want full access? Go Premium and unlock all 14 pages.
Access to all documents
Download any document
Ad free experience

Upgrade to remove ads
Unformatted text preview:

1/30/08 1 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill 1 Power point slides prepared by Leonard R. Mendola, Ph.D. Touro College Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill 2 The Self, Identity, Emotions, and Personality Chapter 4 Outline • The Self – Self-Understanding – Self-Esteem and Self-Concept • Identity – Erikson’s Ideas on Identity – The Four Statuses of Identity – Developmental Changes in Identity – Identity and Social Contexts – Identity and Intimacy Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill 3 The Self, Identity, Emotions, and Personality Chapter 4 Outline • Emotional Development – The Emotions of Adolescence – Hormones, Experience, and Emotions – Emotional Competence • Personality Development – Personality – Temperament (Continued from previous slide)1/30/08 2 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill 4 The Self • Self-Understanding – Self-understanding is a social-cognitive construction (Harter, 2006; McLean & Pratt, 2006) – Self-understanding is the individual’s cognitive representation of the self, the substance and content of self-conceptions. Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill 5 Dimensions of Self-Understanding • Social Comparison • Self-Consciousness • Self-Protection • Unconscious Self • Self-Integration Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill 6 Self-Understanding and Social Contexts • Adolescent’s self-understanding can vary across relationships and social roles • They also can differ depending on whether the adolescent is in the role of student, athlete or employee • Adolescents’ portraits of themselves can differ depending on whether they describe themselves when they are with their mother, father, close friend, romantic partner, or peer • Adolescents might create different selves depending on their ethnic and cultural background and experiences (Lalonde & Chandler, 2004).1/30/08 3 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill 7 What are Self-Esteem and Self-Concept? • Self-esteem – Also referred to as self-worth or self-image – is the global evaluative dimension of the self • For example, an adolescent or emerging adult might perceive that she is not merely a person, but a good person. • Self-concept – Refers to domain-specific evaluations of the self. • For example an adolescent may have a negative academic self-concept because he is not doing well at school, but have a positive athletic self-concept because he is a star swimmer. Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill 8 Measuring Self-Esteem and Self-Concept • Susan Harter (1989) developed a measure for adolescents: – the Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents. – It assesses eight domains: • scholastic competence • athletic competence • social acceptance • physical appearance • behavioral conduct • close friendship • romantic appeal and job competence • plus global self-worth Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill 9 Measuring Self-Esteem and Self-Concept Behavioral observations in the assessment of self-esteem Fig. 4.11/30/08 4 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill 10 Self-Esteem: Perception and Reality • Self-esteem reflects perceptions that do not always match reality (Baumeister & others, 2003). • Self-esteem fluctuates across the life span • During and just after many life transitions, individuals’ self-esteem often decreases. Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill 11 Self-Esteem: Perception and Reality • Does Self-Esteem Change During Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood? • Is Self-Esteem Linked to Success in School and Initiative? • Are Some Domains More Closely Linked to Self-Esteem Than Others? Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill 12 Social Contexts and Self-Esteem • Social contexts such as the family, peers, and schools contribute to the development of an adolescent’s self-esteem (Dusek & McIntyre, 2003; Harter, 2006; Turnage, 2004). • Peer judgments gain increasing importance in adolescence1/30/08 5 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill 13 Social Contexts and Self-Esteem • Consequences of Low Self-Esteem – For most adolescents, the emotional discomfort of low self-esteem is temporary – Low self-esteem has been implicated in depression, suicide, anorexia nervosa, delinquency, and other adjustment problems (Donnellan & others, 2005, 2006; Flory & others, 2004). Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill 14 Social Contexts and Self-Esteem • Increasing Adolescents’ Self-Esteem – Four ways to improve adolescents’ and emerging adults’ self-esteem are: (1) Identify the causes of low self-esteem and the domains of competence important to the self (2) Provide emotional support and social approval (3) Foster achievement (4) Help adolescents to cope Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill 15 Social Contexts and Self-Esteem • Increasing Adolescents’ Self-Esteem – Self-esteem often increases when adolescents face a problem and try to cope with it rather than avoid it (Dyson & Renk, 2006; Nes & Segerstrom, 2006) – Facing problems realistically, honestly, and non-defensively produces favorable self-evaluative thoughts, which lead to the self-generated approval that raises self-esteem.1/30/08 6 Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill 16 Identity • By far the most comprehensive and provocative theory of identity development is that of Erik Erikson Copyright © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. McGraw-Hill 17 Identity • Erikson’s Ideas on Identity – Who am I? – What am I all about? – What am I going to do with my life?


Download Adolescence
Our administrator received your request to download this document. We will send you the file to your email shortly.
Loading Unlocking...
Login

Join to view Adolescence and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or
We will never post anything without your permission.
Don't have an account?
Sign Up

Join to view Adolescence 2 2 and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or

By creating an account you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use

Already a member?