GSU POLS 1101 - Civil Liberties/Rights and the Bill of Rights (4 pages)

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Civil Liberties/Rights and the Bill of Rights



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Civil Liberties/Rights and the Bill of Rights

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Covers the difference between Civil Liberties and Civil Rights, the debate over the Bill of Rights, and some amendments.


Lecture number:
6
Pages:
4
Type:
Lecture Note
School:
Georgia State University
Course:
Pols 1101 - American Government
Edition:
1

Unformatted text preview:

POLS 1101 1st Edition Lecture 6 Outline of Last Lecture I Federalism A Why do we have it B Evolution II Division of Powers III Coercive Federalism Outline of Current Lecture I Civil Liberties vs Civil Rights II Historical Context A Federalists vs Anti Federalists III Bill of Rights Current Lecture I Civil Liberties vs Civil Rights Civil Liberties are individual liberties that are protected from the government This means that the government cannot change them Civil liberties include freedom of speech press assembly religion and the right to bear arms Civil Rights involve more government control and typically are about groups of people They include the right to vote discrimination and equality of races and immigration Civil rights are associated with positive freedom because they refer to the positive actions the government should take in protecting groups of people particularly minorities These notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor s lecture GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes not as a substitute Civil liberties are associated with negative freedom because they are protection from intrusion into our personal freedoms by the government Many people believe the Bill of Rights should be called the Bill of Liberties as the definition for civil liberties fits the aim of the Bill of Rights better II Historical Context Before the Civil War Barron vs Baltimore 1833 Barron said Baltimore ruined his harbor and sued the state He brought up the 5th amendment Supreme court said they couldn t do anything 14th Amendment Makes 5th amendment directly applicable to the states Freedom of Religion Establishment Clause Free Exercise Clause Violations of Civil Liberties School prayer Religious displays on public property Government funding of religious schools The Lemon Test Secular purpose Cannot advance or inhibit religion Excessive entanglement Freedom of Speech Schenck vs U S 1919 Distributed anti conscription leaflets not protected Gitlow vs



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