Mizzou MANGMT 3540 - Chapter 4 Continued and Chapter 5 (3 pages)

Previewing page 1 of 3 page document View the full content.
View Full Document

Chapter 4 Continued and Chapter 5



Previewing page 1 of actual document.

View the full content.
View Full Document
View Full Document

Chapter 4 Continued and Chapter 5

206 views

Chapter 4: Intentional Torts Chapter 5: Unintentional Torts


Lecture number:
6
Pages:
3
Type:
Lecture Note
School:
University of Missouri
Course:
Mangmt 3540 - Introduction to Business Law
Edition:
1

Unformatted text preview:

MGMT 3540 1nd Edition Lecture 6 Outline of Last Lecture Intentional Infliction of Emotional Distress Defamation Four Types of Invasion of Privacy Fraudulent Misrepresentation Property Torts Outline of Current Lecture Property Torts intentional Continued Negligence Defenses to Negligence Strict Liability Current Lecture Property Torts intentional Continued Business Tort intentional interference with contract or business relationship With a contract The defendant knew the plaintiff had a contract with a third party and The defendant intentionally induced the third party to break the contract usually to get the business for himself With a business relationship The defendant knew of the existing business between the plaintiff and a third party and The defendant used predatory practices to obtain business for herself Business implication for intentional torts employer often liable for actual and punitive damages Negligence Defined An unintentional violation of a legal duty to use a standard of care Four Required Elements of Proof Was there These notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor s lecture GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes not as a substitute An unintentional act or nonfeasance If not look at the intentional torts and see if all the elements of proof are present for one or more torts A legal duty to use a standard of care Examples no duty Standard of care can vary with the actor and activity Actor higher standard for professionals lower standard for young children Activities higher standards for more dangerous activity A violation of that standard Typically a fact question for a judge or jury to decide Negligence per say when the act of the defendant violates a safety standard sometimes the jury only decides if there is a violation of the statute automatically presumed to be negligence Example who ran a run light Who breached a contract Plumber doesn t cap gas in the kitchen and causes an explosion violated statute



View Full Document

Access the best Study Guides, Lecture Notes and Practice Exams

Loading Unlocking...
Login

Join to view Chapter 4 Continued and Chapter 5 and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or
We will never post anything without your permission.
Don't have an account?
Sign Up

Join to view Chapter 4 Continued and Chapter 5 and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or

By creating an account you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use

Already a member?