UIUC ATMS 100 - Atmospheric Moisture (3 pages)

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Atmospheric Moisture



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Atmospheric Moisture

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Brief overview of water vapor, humidity, and the ways to measure water vapor


Lecture number:
6
Pages:
3
Type:
Lecture Note
School:
University of Illinois at Urbana, Champaign
Course:
Atms 100 - Introduction to Meteorology
Edition:
1

Unformatted text preview:

Lecture 6 Outline of Last Lecture I Earth s Orbit II Earth s Axis III The Seasons IV Angle of Sun V Seasonal Temperature VI Controls of Temperature VII Daily High Temperatures VIII Nocturnal Cooling IX The Role of Clouds Outline of Current Lecture X Water Vapor in the Atmosphere XI Humidity XII Evaporation XIII Condensation XIV Saturation XV Conclusion XVI Increasing Temperature XVII Decreasing Temperature XVIII Atmospheric Humidity XIX Vapor Pressure XX Saturation Vapor Pressure ATMS 100 1st Edition Relative Humidity Changing Relative Humidity Dew Point Temperature Current Lecture XXIV Water Vapor in the Atmosphere a water vapor is the most important atmospheric gas to weather changes i rain snow and clouds are all forms of water in the atmosphere ii concentration variable between 0 4 of air iii greenhouse gas XXV Humidity a measure of water vapor in the atmosphere i doesn t only mean relative humidity b there are many ways to measure atmospheric moisture XXVI Evaporation a liquid water molecules break bonds with other water molecules and become gas i water absorbs latent heat ii cools surroundings XXVII Condensation XXI XXII XXIII These notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor s lecture GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes not as a substitute a water vapor molecules form bonds with other water molecules XXVIII a b c XXIX a b c XXX a XXXI a b c d e XXXII a b XXXIII a XXXIV a b c XXXV a and become liquid i releases latent heat ii warms surroundings Evaporation and Condensation water molecules continuously transition between liquid and gaseous states at the surface of liquid water if more molecules evaporate than condense water vapor concentration in air increases if more molecules condense than evaporate water vapor concentration in air decreases Saturation saturation water vapor concentration in the air at which evaporation and condensation are equal air is never so full of water that there is no room for any more air is not a



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