UConn URBN 2000 - September 17 Slides-1 (17 pages)

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September 17 Slides-1



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September 17 Slides-1

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Pages:
17
School:
University Of Connecticut
Course:
Urbn 2000 - Introduction to Urban Studies
Introduction to Urban Studies Documents

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Community does not have a singular agreed upon definition It usually refers to a group sharing physical space a neighborhood a city etc a group sharing a particular trait lifestyle religion sexuality age etc a group sharing an identity and a culture typified by a high degree of social cohesion a traditional community Overall these definitions suggest a sense of shared identity and interdependence what Phillips calls we ness Social cohesion group behavior resulting from strong social bonds and defined norms To achieve cohesion group members accept the groups goals and standards of behavior Often implies some sort of homogeneity Communities do no HAVE to be based in the same place and people based in the same place are not NECESSARILY communities Some non place bound sorts of communities can be members of professional groups subcultures and countercultures The Origins of Community Democracy and the City the Greek Polis Polis A self sufficient small scale political unit a citystate Could be thought of as a metropolitan community All issues of public concern to be decided by the community legislation occurred in large public assemblies direct democracy Thus the rise of democracy is directly linked to the rise of the city The word cosmopolis also arose in this time 5th century BCE It means literally world city and implies that people should be world citizens rather than just citizens of their local communities Classical Urban Theory and Transitions of Social Organization The birth of urban theory and the discipline of sociology occurred as the massive upheaval of democratic revolutions and the industrial revolution were occurring in the mid to late 19th century The main questions theorists were asking was how urban life changed the way that people lived their lives and related to one another Though they had significant differences the unifying idea was that society was evolving in a way that was inevitable and unstoppable and that a new form of social organization was



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