ISU PSY 110 - Sensation and Perception (7 pages)

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Sensation and Perception



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Sensation and Perception

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Lecture number:
5
Pages:
7
Type:
Lecture Note
School:
Illinois State University
Course:
Psy 110 - Fundamentals of Psychology
Edition:
1

Unformatted text preview:

PSY 110 1st Edition Lecture 5 Outline of Last Lecture I The Process of Sensation II Vision III The Eye Outline of Current Lecture I Hearing and Balance II Smell Taste and Touch III Influences on Attention IV Principles of Perception V Unusual Perceptual Experiences Current Lecture Hearing and Balance Sound the Ear and Hearing Frequency Number of cycles completed by a sound wave in one second determining the pitch of the sound expressed in the unit Hertz Hz Amplitude Measures the loudness of a sound expressed in the unit decibels Decibels dB Unit of measurement for the loudness of sounds Timbre Distinctive quality of a sound that distinguishes it from other sounds of the same pitch and loudness Audition The sensation and process of hearing Outer Ear Visible part of the ear containing the Pinna Curved flap of cartilage and skin attached to sides of head Auditory Canal 1 in long and entrance is lined with little hairs Middle Ear Eardrum At end of auditory canal a thin flexible membrane about 1 3 in in diameter These notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor s lecture GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes not as a substitute Ossicles Three smallest bones in human body that connect eardrum to the oval window Hammer Anvil and Stirrup Oval Window Membrane that transmits vibrations from ossicles to cochlea Inner Ear Innermost part of the ear Cochlea Fluid filled snail shaped bony chamber lined with sensory receptors hair cells Semicircular Canals Three fluid filled tubular canals that sense rotation of the head Hair Cells Sensory receptors for hearing that are attached to the basilar membrane in the cochlea Bone Conduction The vibrations of the bones in the face and skull Place Theory Each individual pitch a person hears is determined by the particular location along the basilar membrane of the cochlea that vibrates the most Frequency Theory Hair cell receptors vibrate the same number of times per second as the sounds that reach them



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