GSU ASTR 1010 - Introduction to Chapter 1, Part 2 (2 pages)

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Introduction to Chapter 1, Part 2



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Introduction to Chapter 1, Part 2

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The continuation lecture to the lecture on the first day of class.


Lecture number:
2
Pages:
2
Type:
Lecture Note
School:
Georgia State University
Course:
Astr 1010 - Astronomy of the Solar System
Edition:
1

Unformatted text preview:

ASTR 1010 1st Edition Lecture 2 Outline of Last Lecture I Our Modern View of the Universe A Definitions B The Scale of the Universe Outline of Current Lecture I The History of the Universe II Spaceship Earth Current Lecture I The History of the Universe The average distance between galaxies is increasing meaning the universe is expanding In order for the universe to be expanding it is assumed that the galaxies were once close enough for the expansion process to begin That beginning of the expansion process is the Big Bang which occurred about 14 billion years ago and is often cited as the beginning of life on Earth Individual galaxies do not expand apart because the force of gravity wins out over the expansion and holds it together A star is born when gravity pushes enough material into a cloud that forms a hot hard center that generates energy from nuclear fusion The star lives as long as the energy from the fusion continues and dies when it runs out A star throws its contents back into space but a massive star becomes a supernova before dying out What remains is then recycled into galaxies II Spaceship Earth The Earth spins or rotates on its axis once a day and makes a full orbit or revolution around the sun once a year The Earth s axis is the imaginary line connecting the North and South Pole The Earth rotates from west to east making the sun and moon appear to rise in the east and set in the west An astrological unit AU is Earth s average orbital distance It is equivalent to 150 million kilometers 93 million miles Earth races around the sun at an average of 100 000 km h Earth s orbital path defines a plane called the ecliptic plane Earth is tilted on its axis at a 23 5 angle perpendicular to the ecliptic plane The axis tilt points also exactly at Polaris or the North Star Our solar system completes one orbit around the Milky Way once every 230 million years moving at a speed of 800 000 km hr



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