FSU PHI 2630 - Lawrence, Racist Speech as the Functional Equivalent of Fighting Words (4 pages)

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Lawrence, Racist Speech as the Functional Equivalent of Fighting Words



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Lawrence, Racist Speech as the Functional Equivalent of Fighting Words

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Notes on Lawrence's examination of racist speech and why it should not be protected by the First Amendment.


Lecture number:
4
Pages:
4
Type:
Lecture Note
School:
Florida State University
Course:
Phi 2630 - Ethical Issues and Life Choices (3).

Unformatted text preview:

PHI 2630 1st Edition Lecture 4 Outline of Last Lecture I Normative Ethical Theories the branch of ethics concerned with giving a general account of what is right and what is wrong II Consequentialism a Utilitarianism b Perfectionist Consequentialism c Rule Consequentialism III Natural Law a Theory of Intrinsic Value b The Doctrine of Double Effect IV Kantian Moral Theory a Humanity Formulation b Universal Law Formulation V Rights Based Moral Theory VI Virtue Ethics VII Ethics of Prima Facie Duty a Ross s Theory of Intrinsic Value and Prima Facie Duties VIII Social Contract Theory a John Rawls s Theory These notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor s lecture GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes not as a substitute Outline of Current Lecture II Stanford s Regulation of Speech III Why the Regulation is In Line with the First Amendment IV Why Face to Face Insults are not Worthy of First Amendment Protection a Immediacy of Injury b Purpose of the First Amendment V Factors that Indicate the Non Speech Provoking Character of the Attacks a Visceral Emotional Response b Pre Emptive Nature c Societal Position of Victims d Double Standard Current Lecture I The following work is based on responses to racist speech and other forms of verbal discriminatory harassment on college campuses Stanford in particular and what measures the universities should take in response II The Regulation All Stanford students have a right to equal access to a Stanford education without discrimination on the basis of sex race color handicap religion sexual orientation or national and ethnic origin The regulation prohibits hate speech on campus because it interferes with this right of students In the context of discriminatory harassment fighting words or nonverbal symbols are words pictures or symbols that by virtue of their form are commonly understood to convey direct and visceral hatred or contempt for human beings on the basis of their sex race color handicap



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