UW-Madison LINGUIS 101 - Phonetics and how speech is produced (3 pages)

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Phonetics and how speech is produced



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Phonetics and how speech is produced

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Lecture Notes for Lecture 2


Lecture number:
2
Pages:
3
Type:
Lecture Note
School:
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Course:
Linguis 101 - Human Language

Unformatted text preview:

LINGUIS 101 1nd Edition Lecture 2 Outline of Last Lecture I What is this course about II What is Linguistics III Five subfields of Linguistics IV Descriptive vs Prescriptive Grammar Outline of Current Lecture I Subfields of Phonetics II How speech sounds are produced III Constants vs Vowels a Parameters for describing consonants Current Lecture I Phonetics scientific study of the inventory and structure of the sounds of human language a Articulatory phonetics physiological mechanisms of speech production b Acoustic phonetics physical properties of sound waves produced in speech c Auditory phonetics perception of sound including what happens in the ear auditory nerve and brain during speech perception II How speech sounds are produced a Airstream mechanism something gets the air moving Usually the lungs pulmonic air is usually moving outwards egressive b Sound source moving air begins to make sound when it passes through the These notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor s lecture GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes not as a substitute larynx Adam s apple c Filters articulators in the vocal tract are moved to shape the airflow into distinct sounds i Articulators can be positioned to create different filter shapes III 1 Lips 2 Teeth 3 Tongue 4 Alveolar ridge the bump behind front theeth 5 Palate hard palate top of mouth 6 Velum soft palate soft part near back of mouth 7 Uvula 8 Pharynx 9 Glottis empty space between vocal folds and where the air passes through make different shapes to make different sounds Constants vs Vowels a Consonant a high degree of constriction in vocal tract i Narrow air path 1 Example z b Vowel vocal tract is relatively open i Example o c Parameters for describing constants i voicing state of the glottis 1 Voiced vocal folds vibrating zap 2 Voiceless vocal folds not vibrating sap ii Nasality whether or not air is flowing 1 nasal Velum lowered air flows through nasal cavity mud 2 oral velum raised no



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