FSU PHI 2630 - Types of Fallacies (3 pages)

Previewing page 1 of 3 page document View the full content.
View Full Document

Types of Fallacies



Previewing page 1 of actual document.

View the full content.
View Full Document
View Full Document

Types of Fallacies

306 views

An brief overview of the principle of charity, the basis tenants of an argument, and an outline of important logical fallacies.


Lecture number:
1
Pages:
3
Type:
Lecture Note
School:
Florida State University
Course:
Phi 2630 - Ethical Issues and Life Choices (3).

Unformatted text preview:

PHI 2630 1st Edition Lecture 1 Outline of Current Lecture I Principle of Charity II Argument Structure III Types of Logical Fallacies Current Lecture I Principle of Charity a If there are various ways to interpret an argument you should always use the most charitable strongest one so that you avoid attacking a straw man see below and have a much higher caliber of discourse II Basic Structure of Arguments a Premises intended to support the conclusion b Conclusion supported by the premises III Types of Logical Fallacies a Appeal to Ignorance i We don t know that this is true so it must be false ii Example No one has proved that aliens exist so they in fact do not exist b Ad Hominem i Attacking one s opponent instead of addressing their claims ii Example It is clear that Clinton had sexual relations with that woman so we should not aid the struggling Mexican economy like he suggests c Begging the Question Assuming the Conclusion i When the conclusion of the argument is included in the premises for that same argument This is a type of circular reasoning that assumes the conclusion A implies B which implies A ii Example 1 We know the Bible is true because there was a miracle witnessed by 500 people 2 We know there was a miracle witnessed by 500 people because the Bible says so d Equivocation i When an argument intentionally uses an ambiguous word and changes the meaning of said word in the argument ii Example These notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor s lecture GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes not as a substitute 1 I m going to the bank to cash this check 2 Banks are on the side of rivers 3 Therefore I am going to cash this check on the side of a river e Composition and Division i An argument that implies something is true of the whole because it is true of a part and vice versa ii Example 1 From part to whole If someone stands up at a football game he can see the field better Therefore if everyone stands up they can all see



View Full Document

Access the best Study Guides, Lecture Notes and Practice Exams

Loading Unlocking...
Login

Join to view Types of Fallacies and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or
We will never post anything without your permission.
Don't have an account?
Sign Up

Join to view Types of Fallacies and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or

By creating an account you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use

Already a member?