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OTTAWA ADM 1100 - Chapter 1 - Introduction to Management

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Chapter 1 - Introduction to ManagementWho is a Manager?- Someone who works with and through other people by coordinating their work activities in order to accomplish organizational goals.o A manager’s job is not about personal achievement—it’s about helping others dotheir work and achieve. Types of Managers- First-line (or frontline) managers o Manage the work of nonmanagerial employees who typically are involved with producing the organization’s products or servicing the organization’s customers. o These managers often have titles such as supervisors or even shift managers, district managers, department managers, or office managers. - Middle managers o Manage the work of first-line managers and can be found between the lowest and top levels of the organization. o They may have titles such as regional manager, project leader, store manager, or division manager. - At the upper levels of the organization are the top managerso Responsible for making organization-wide decisions and establishing the plans and goals that affect the entire organization. o These individuals typically have titles such as executive vice president, president, managing director, chief operating officer, or chief executive officer.Where do managers work- Organizations – a deliberate arrangement of people to accomplish some specific purposeo Composed of people and have a deliberate structure within which members do their work.  That structure may be open and flexible, with no specific job duties or strict adherence to explicit job arrangements.Efficiency and Effectiveness- Efficiency - getting the most output from the least amount of inputs- Effectiveness - often described as “doing the right things”—that is, those work activities that will help the organization reach its goalso Whereas efficiency is concerned with the means of getting things done, effectiveness is concerned with the ends, or attainment of organizational goalsManagement Functions- Planningo They set goals, establish strategies for achieving those goals, and develop plans to integrate and coordinate activities.- Organizingo Managers are also responsible for arranging and structuring work that employees do to accomplish the organization’s goals.o They determine what tasks are to be done, who is to do them, how the tasks are to be grouped, who reports to whom, and where decisions are to be made.- Leadingo Every organization has people, and a manager’s job is to work with and through people to accomplish goalso When managers motivate subordinates, help resolve work group conflicts, influence individuals or teams as they work, select the most effective communication channel, or deal in any way with employee behaviour issues, they’re leading- Controllingo To ensure goals are met and work is done as it should be, managers monitor and evaluate performance. o Actual performance is compared with the set goals. If those goals aren’t achieved, it’s the manager’s job to get work back on track.  This process of monitoring, comparing, and correcting is the controlling function.Mintzberg’s Managerial Roles and a Contemporary Model of Managing- Managerial roles - specific actions or behaviours expected of and exhibited by a managero When describing what managers do from a roles perspective, we’re not looking at a specific person per se, but at the expectations and responsibilities associated with the person in that role—the role of a manager.- The interpersonal roles involve working with people (subordinates and persons outside the organization) or performing duties that are ceremonial and symbolic in nature. o The three interpersonal roles include being a figurehead, leader, and liaison. - The informational roles involve receiving, collecting, and disseminating information. o The three informational roles include monitor, disseminator, and spokesperson. - The decisional roles involve making significant choices that affect the organization. o The four decisional roles include entrepreneur, disturbance handler, resource allocator, and negotiator. Management Skills- Technical skills include knowledge of and expertise in a certain specialized field, such as engineering, computers, accounting, or manufacturing. o These skills are more important at lower levels of management since these managers are dealing directly with employees doing the organization’s work.- Human skills involve the ability to work well with other people, both individually and in a group. Because managers deal directly with peopleo This skill is crucial for managers at all levels! o Managers with good human skills are able to get the best out of their people. They know how to communicate, motivate, lead, and inspire enthusiasm and trust. - Conceptual skills involve the mental ability to analyze and generate ideas about abstractand complex situations. o These skills help managers see the organization as a whole, understand the relationships among various subunits, and visualize how the organization fits intoits broader environment. o These skills are most important at the top management levels.How is the Manager’s Job Changing?- Managers must create a customer-responsive organization where employees are friendly and courteous, accessible, knowledgeable, prompt in responding to customer needs, and willing to do what’s necessary to please the customer- More and more businesses are turning to social media not just as a way to connect with customers, but also as a way to manage their human resources and tap into their innovation and talent.- Success in business today demands innovation. o Innovation means exploring new territory, taking risks, and doing things differently. - An adaptable organization creates a set of skills, processes, and a culture that enable it to continuously look for new problems and offer solutions before the clients even realize they have a need.- From a business perspective, sustainability has been described as a company’s ability toachieve its business goals and increase long-term shareholder value by integrating economic, environmental, and social opportunities into its business strategiesWhy Study Management?- It is universalo Management is needed in all types and sizes of organizations, at all organizational levels and in all organizational work areas, and in all organizations,no matter where they’re locatedSkills Exercise- Develop your networking ability- Work on gaining interpersonal influence- Develop your


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