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FSU AMH 4173 - Post Civil War Final Exam

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Ku Klux Klan and Post Civil War Violence- Ku Klux Klan-Forms in Tennessee-Also generic organizations formed, such as the Knights of the White Camilla- Who did the Klan intimidate?-Freedmen-Republicans- Klan in FloridaJackson County War: The "Jackson County War" was one of the most violent uprisings in the Reconstruction era south. Murders, political assassinations, assaults and bitter reprisals were the tactics of the day and over a period of several years; the Northwest Florida County literally became the scene of a bloodbath as bad as any in Missouri and Kansas during the years before the war. The uprising targeted both white leaders and their supporters as well as black freedmen and the exact number of deaths that took place may never be known. Some estimates have ranged as high as 168 over a four year period.- The Klan and the Election of 1868Camilla, Georgia RiotKlan intimidation- Reasons why the Klan declined-Democrats turned to other tactics and began taking over state governments-Republican and Freedmen power declined-Ku Klux Klan Act of 1871President Grant, 1871, Deep South, particularly South Carolina, also known as the2Civil Rights Act of 1871,2Force Act of 1871,2Ku Klux Force Act,2Ku Klux Klan Act,2Third Enforcement Act, or2Third Ku Klux Klan Act. The act empowered the2President2to suspend the2writ2of2habeas corpus2to combat the2Ku Klux Klan2(KKK) and other white supremacy organizations during the2Reconstruction Era. The act was passed by the242nd United States Congress2during the2Reconstruction Era2and signed into law by President2Ulysses S. Grant2on April 20, 1871. Theact was the last of three Enforcement Acts2passed by the2United States Congress2from 1870 to 1871 during the2Reconstruction Era2to combat attacks upon the2suffrage rights2of2African Americans.2This is significant because after the act's passage, the president had the power for the first time to both suppress state disorders on his own initiative and to suspend the right of habeas corpus. Grant did not hesitate to use this authority on numerous occasions during his presidency, and as a result the first era KKK was completely dismantled and did not resurface in any meaningful way until the first part of the 20th centuryUlysses S. Grant’s 1 st and 2 nd Administrations Election of 1868 Ulysses S. Grant (R) vs. Horatio Seymour (D)After numerous ballots, the2Democrats2nominated2Horatio Seymour2to take on the2Republican2candidate, Civil War General2Ulysses S. Grant. Grant was one of the most popular men in the North due to his efforts in concluding the Civil War successfully for the Union. Although Seymour was buried in the Electoral College, he gave Grant a good race for thepopular vote, especially considering the temporary advantages that Grant could draw upon, beinga Radical. In addition to his appeal in the North, Grant benefited from votes among the newly enfranchised2freedmen2in the2South, while the temporary political disenfranchisement of many Southern whites also helped Republican margins there. It was also the first election in which2African Americans2could vote (in accordance with the First Reconstruction Act) in every (Northern or Reconstructed) state; Grant won office thanks to the black vote, which numbered above 700,000.- Grant’s Cabinet decisionsKu Klux Klan Act of 1871: also known as the2Civil Rights Act of 1871,2Force Act of 1871,2Ku Klux Force Act,2Ku Klux Klan Act,2Third Enforcement Act, or2Third Ku Klux Klan Act. The act empowered the2President2to suspend the2writ2of2habeas corpus2to combat the2Ku Klux Klan2(KKK) and other white supremacy organizations during the2Reconstruction Era. The act was passed by the242nd United States Congress2during the2Reconstruction Era2and signed into law by President2Ulysses S. Grant2on April 20, 1871. The act was the last of three Enforcement Acts2passed by the2United States Congress2from 1870 to 1871 during the2Reconstruction Era2to combat attacks upon the2suffrage rights2of2African Americans- Grant’s Foreign Policyo CSS Alabama ClaimsIn 872 were a series of claims for2damages2by the U.S. government against the2government of the United Kingdom2for the assistance given to the2Confederate2cause during the2American Civil War. After2international arbitration endorsed the American position in 1872, Britain settled the matter by paying the United States $15.5 million for damages done by several warships built in Britain and sold to the Confederacy, thus ending the dispute and ensuring friendly relations. Thisis significant because it led to the Treaty of Washington. Britain and the United States became perpetual allies after the treaty, with Britain having expressed regret over the2Alabama2damages.o Santo DomingoWas an attempted treaty during later2Reconstruction, initiated by President2Ulysses S. Grant2in 1869, to annex “Santo Domingo” (as the2Dominican Republic was then commonly known) as a2U.S.2territory, with the promise of eventual statehood. President Grant believed that that the annexed territory (on the island of2Hispaniola) would serve as a safe haven for2African Americans2from the2Southern United States, who were suffering violent persecution by the2Ku Klux Klan. Grant also believed that the acquisition of Santo Domingo would help bring about theend of slavery in those parts of the Americas that still practiced it, such as2Brazil. A further motive was Dominican agricultural and mineral resources would benefit the U.S. economy. A U.S. naval port in the Dominican Republic would also serve as protection for a projected canal across the2Isthmus of Darien. The2Dominican Republic2annexation treaty ultimately failed due topolitical turmoil and misunderstanding between Grant and Congress. In addition, the defeat of the treaty in the Senate ultimately contributed to the division of the Republican party into two opposing factions during the election of 1872: the2Radical Republicans2(composed of Grant and his loyalists) and the2Liberal Republicans(composed of Schurz, Sumner,2Horace Greeley2as presidential candidate, and other opponents of Grant). This also is significant because it solidified the hatred between Charles Sumner and Ulysses S. Grant.- Election of 1872Ulysses S. Grant vs. Horace GreeleyThe election was the first in which every competing state used a popular vote to determine its electors. Also, it is so far the only election in which a presidential candidate died during the electoral process. Because Greeley died only a month


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