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Reading Test

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Practice Test #1Take the Practice TestGet Credit for All You KnowTest-Taking StrategiesReading Test Writing and Language Test Math Test – No Calculator Math Test – Calculator Resources to Help You PrepareYour PSAT 10 ScoresMake the Best Use of Your Practice TestBlank PageBlank PageBlank Page1 1 27Reading Test 60 MINUTES, 47 QUESTIONS Turn to Section 1 of your answer sheet to answer the questions in this section. DIRECTIONS Each passage or pair of passages below is followed by a number of questions. After reading each passage or pair, choose the best answer to each question based on what is stated or implied in the passage or passages and in any accompanying graphics (such as a table or graph). Questions 1-9 are based on the following passage. This passage is adapted from Jane Austen, Emma, originally published in 1815. Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of Line 5 existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her. She was the youngest of the two daughters of a most affectionate, indulgent father, and had, in consequence of her sister’s marriage, been mistress of his house from a very early period. Her mother had 10 died too long ago for her to have more than an indistinct remembrance of her caresses, and her place had been supplied by an excellent woman as governess, who had fallen little short of a mother in affection. 15 Sixteen years had Miss Taylor been in Mr. Woodhouse’s family, less as a governess than a friend, very fond of both daughters, but particularly of Emma. Between them it was more the intimacy of sisters. Even before Miss Taylor had ceased to hold 20 the nominal office of governess, the mildness of her temper had hardly allowed her to impose any restraint; and the shadow of authority being now long passed away, they had been living together as friend and friend very mutually attached, and Emma 25 doing just what she liked; highly esteeming Miss Taylor’s judgment, but directed chiefly by ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... The real evils indeed of Emma’s situation were the power of having rather too much her own way, and a 30 disposition to think a little too well of herself; these were the disadvantages which threatened alloy to her many enjoyments. The danger, however, was at present so unperceived, that they did not by any means rank as misfortunes with her. 35 Sorrow came—a gentle sorrow—but not at all in the shape of any disagreeable consciousness.—Miss Taylor married. It was Miss Taylor’s loss which first brought grief. It was on the wedding-day of this beloved friend that Emma 40 first sat in mournful thought of any continuance. The wedding over and the bride-people gone, her father and herself were left to dine together, with no prospect of a third to cheer a long evening. Her father composed himself to sleep after dinner, as 45 usual, and she had then only to sit and think of what she had lost. The event had every promise of happiness for her friend. Mr. Weston was a man of unexceptionable character, easy fortune, suitable age and pleasant 50 manners; and there was some satisfaction in considering with what self-denying, generous friendship she had always wished and promoted the match; but it was a black morning’s work for her. The want of Miss Taylor would be felt every hour of 55 every day. She recalled her past kindness—the kindness, the affection of sixteen years—how she had taught and how she had played with her from five her own. years old—how she had devoted all her powers to attach and amuse her in health—and how nursed her 60 through the various illnesses of childhood. A large Unauthorized copying or reuse of any part of this page is illegal. 7 CO N T INUE381 1 debt of gratitude was owing here; but the intercourse of the last seven years, the equal footing and perfect unreserve which had soon followed Isabella’s marriage on their being left to each other, was yet a 65 dearer, tenderer recollection. It had been a friend and companion such as few possessed, intelligent, well-informed, useful, gentle, knowing all the ways of the family, interested in all its concerns, and peculiarly interested in herself, in every pleasure, 70 every scheme of her’s;—one to whom she could speak every thought as it arose, and who had such an affection for her as could never find fault. How was she to bear the change?—It was true that her friend was going only half a mile from them; but 75 Emma was aware that great must be the difference between a Mrs. Weston only half a mile from them, and a Miss Taylor in the house; and with all her advantages, natural and domestic, she was now in great danger of suffering from intellectual solitude. 80 She dearly loved her father, but he was no companion for her. He could not meet her in conversation, rational or playful. The evil of the actual disparity in their ages (and Mr. Woodhouse had not married early) was much 85 increased by his constitution and habits; for having been a valetudinarian* all his life, without activity of mind or body, he was a much older man in ways than in years; and though everywhere beloved for the friendliness of his heart and his amiable temper, his 90 talents could not have recommended him at any time. *a person in weak health who is overly concerned with his or her ailments 1 The main purpose of the passage is to A) describe a main character and a significantchange in her life.B) provide an overview of a family and a nearbyneighbor. C) discuss some regrettable personality flaws in amain character.D) explain the relationship between a maincharacter and her father................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 2 Which choice best summarizes the first two paragraphs of the passage (lines 1-14)? A) Even though a character loses a parent at anearly age, she is happily raised in a loving home.B) An affectionate governess helps a character toovercome the loss of


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