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UGA PSYC 3100 - HW Exploring Cultural Diversity in Gender - Examples of Third Genders

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Exploring Cultural Diversity in Gender: Examples of Third GendersFor this brief assignment, all students will learn a little about a specific gender category by watching a brief video and reading an accompanying popular press article. Please see the list at the end of this assignment and find your name to see which gender you will be learning about; once you do, find the video and article about your assigned gender on eLC and watch/read them.After you have finished, please answer the following questions and submit your answers to the dropbox on eLC before our next class. During class, you will be asked to share what you learned with some of your classmates, so be sure to have a copy of your assignment accessible if you think you’ll need it to remember what you learned. 1. Which gender were you assigned and in what country/culture is this gender category found?I was assigned the Fa’afafine gender which is a part of the Samoan culture in Australia2. Briefly describe how this gender category is defined:a. What sex are people in this category typically assigned at birth? Fa’afafine people are born males but raised as females.b. What characteristics are associated with this gender identity? Characteristics of both genders. They are typically feminine and act like women. The gender roles of Fa’afafine people are related to normal female gender roles.c. How does this gender identity affect sexuality? In other words, do people with this gender identity typically date one particular gender? Or is their gender identity seenas separate from their sexuality? Fa’afafine relationships can be with anyone, but they mostly have relationships with heterosexual men and are not typically considered gay.3. How is this gender identity understood within its culture?:a. Is it mainly socially accepted or socially stigmatized? A lot of Fa’afafine people are subjected to violence from peers. Often they are harassed as their peers try to makethem more male-like. While some in the Samoan culture are understanding, many are not at all.b. Does having this gender identity lead to discrimination in things like employment opportunities? They experience all different types of discrimination.c. Are families generally accepting of a family member with this gender identity or not? Fa’afafine people typically experience some backlash from family members depending on the family, Much like being gay in America, depending on the family, some are very supportive while others are not.4. What was your reaction to learning about this gender identity? You can use this space to talk about other interesting things you learned that you didn’t mention in your previous answers, to connect what you learned to other material from this class or others, or to connect what you learned to your previous experiences/understanding of this topic. Be sure your reaction is at least 100 words long. I was shocked and intrigued to learn about Fa’afafine people because I had no idea it existed. Having never heard of it before, I thought everything I learned about it was super interesting. I found it surprising that while a lot of the time it is the person’s mother who starts raising them asfemale to help with the female gender roles around the house, the brothers in the family would still violently harass them. When thinking about it, it does make sense as to why Samoan mothers in a house full of boys would want to raise one of their boys to help them around the house, but in a way that also seems


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