New version page

UT Arlington NURS 5315 - Chapter 08 Exam

Documents in this Course
Load more

This preview shows page 1-2 out of 7 pages.

View Full Document
View Full Document

End of preview. Want to read all 7 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a GradeBuddy member to access this document.

View Full Document
Unformatted text preview:

Copyright © 2019, Elsevier Inc. All Rights Reserved. 1Chapter 08: Adaptive ImmunityMcCance/Huether: Pathophysiology: The Biologic Basis of Disease in Adults and Children, 8th EditionMULTIPLE CHOICE 1. Which primary characteristic is unique for the immune response?a. The immune response is similar each time it is activated.b. The immune response is specific to the antigen that initiates it.c. The response to a specific pathogen is short term.d. The response is innate, rather than acquired.ANS: BUnlike inflammation, which is nonspecifically activated by cellular damage and pathogenic microorganisms, the immune response is primarily designed to afford long-term specific protection (i.e., immunity) against particular invading microorganisms; that is, it has a memory function. The inflammatory response is similar each time it is activate. Passive immunity is short term or temporary. The inflammatory process is innate.PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Remembering 2. In which structure does B lymphocytes mature and undergo changes that commit them to becoming B cells?a. Thymus glandb. Regional lymph nodesc. Bone marrowd. SpleenANS: CB lymphocytes mature and become B cells in specialized (primary) lymphoid organs—the thymus gland for T cells and the bone marrow for B cells. Neither regional lymph nodes nor the spleen are involved in changing B lymphocytes into B cells.PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Remembering 3. What is the term for the process during which lymphoid stem cells migrate and change into either immunocompetent T cells or immunocompetent B cells?a. Clonal diversityb. Clonal differentiationc. Clonal selectiond. Clonal competenceANS: AThe process is called the generation of clonal diversity and occurs in specialized (primary) lymphoid organs—the thymus gland for T cells and the bone marrow for B cells. Clonal differentiation, selection, and competence do not describe this process.PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Remembering 4. Which type of immunity is produced by an individual after either natural exposure to the antigen or after immunization against the antigen?a. Passive-acquired immunityb. Active-acquired immunityc. Passive-innate immunityd. Active-innate immunityANS: BAn individual produces active-acquired immunity (active immunity) after natural exposure to an antigen or after immunization, whereas passive-acquired immunity (passive immunity) does not involve the host’s immune response at all. The innate immune system, also known as nonspecific immune system and the first line of defense, is composed of the cells and mechanisms that defend the host from infection by other organisms in a nonspecific manner, which means that the cells of the innate system recognize and respond to pathogens in a generic way.PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Remembering 5. What type of immunity is produced when an immunoglobulin crosses the placenta?a. Passive-acquired immunityb. Active-acquired immunityc. Passive-innate immunityd. Active-innate immunityANS: APassive-acquired immunity (passive immunity) does not involve the host’s immune response at all. Rather, passive immunity occurs when preformed antibodies or T lymphocytes are transferred from a donor to the recipient. This transfer can occur naturally, as in the passage of maternal antibodies across the placenta to the fetus, or artificially, as in a clinic using immunotherapy for a specific disease. The remaining options do not produce immunity via immunoglobulin transfer across the placenta.PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: RememberingCopyright © 2019, Elsevier Inc. All Rights Reserved. 2 6. The portion of the antigen that is configured for recognition and binding is referred to as what type of determinant?a. Immunotopeb. Paratopec. Epitoped. AntigenitopeANS: CThe precise portion of the antigen that is configured for recognition and binding is called its antigenic determinant or epitope. The other terms are not discussed in the text.PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Remembering 7. Which characteristic is the most important determinant of immunogenicity when considering the antigen?a. Sizeb. Foreignnessc. Complexityd. QuantityANS: BForemost among the criteria for immunogenicity is the antigen’s foreignness. A self-antigen that fulfills all of these criteria except foreignness does not normally elicit an immune response. Thus most individuals are tolerant of their own antigens. The immune system has an exquisite ability to distinguish self (self-antigens) from nonself (foreign antigens). Size, complexity, and quantity are considered when determining immunogenicity but not to the extent that foreignness is.PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Remembering 8. A student asks why some vaccinations are given orally and some are given by injection. What response by the professor is best?a. Different routes allow the speed of onset of the antigen to be varied, with the intravenous route being the fastest.b. Some individuals appear to be unable to respond to an antigen by a specific route, thus requiring the availability of different routes for the same antigen.c. Antigen-presenting cells are highly specialized and thus require stimulation by different routes.d. Each route stimulates a different lymphocyte-containing tissue, resulting in different types of cellular and humoral immunity.ANS: DEach route preferentially stimulates a different set of lymphocyte-containing (lymphoid) tissues and therefore results in the induction of different types of cell-mediated or humoral immune responses. The speed of onset of the antigen, individual differences in response, and the requirement for different routes to stimulate different antigen-presenting cells are not accurate descriptions of why different routes of immunization are used.PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Understanding 9. The functions of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and CD1 molecules are alike because both do what?a. Are antigen-presenting moleculesb. Bind antigens to antibodiesc. Secrete interleukins during the immune processd. Are capable of activating cytotoxic T lymphocytesANS: AMHC and CD1 molecules are both antigen presenting molecules (APCs). Antigen binding fragments bind antigens to antibodies. Interleukins have many sources, but they are not secreted by MHCs and CD1 molecules. Activating cytotoxic T lymphocytes requires the presence of antigen presentation and effector Th cells.PTS: 1 DIF: Cognitive Level: Remembering 10. Where are antibodies produced?a. Helper T


View Full Document
Loading Unlocking...
Login

Join to view Chapter 08 Exam and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or
We will never post anything without your permission.
Don't have an account?
Sign Up

Join to view Chapter 08 Exam and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or

By creating an account you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use

Already a member?