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Case Conceptualization Chuck

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References1CASE CONCEPTUALIZATIONCase Conceptualization: ChuckLorraine AcostaMay 16th, 2019Johnson & Wales University2CASE CONCEPTUALIZATIONCase Conceptualization: ChuckChuck is a 51-year-old man whose wife has just left him after 27 years of marriage. He works as a tech for an electronics company, which indicates he may fall in the working-class category. According to Sociology professor, Nijole V. Benokraitis, working-class professions offer little to no opportunity for advancement and, sometimes, homeowners may experience foreclosure due to delinquent payments[CITATION NIj \p 144 \l 1033 ]. I believe this may be an additional reason why his wife may have left him for someone else, aside from the reason she gave Chuck, which was that she was unhappy for many years. Though Chuck knew there were ups and downs in his relationship with his wife, he never saw divorce coming. His wife wants the split to be civil and friendly, so, she tends to call him several times per week. While this may seem harmless, this “act of kindness” may be leading Chuck on when she knows she is not getting back together with him. To top it off, she tells him that she is in love with another man. At this point, Chuck is immensely depressed, angry, and, perhaps, suicidal. He is experiencing insomnia and is missing time at work, which concerns me about his mental and emotional state. His anger drove him to tell his children about their mother’s behavior, which indicates he is feeling vengeful, thus, I need to carefully explore those feelings so that he doesn’t do anything that could harm others, primarily his wife or the man she claims to be in love with, or, if he is, indeed, suicidal, himself. Lastly, he is feeling hopeless when it comes to finding love again; I guess you could call him a hopeless romantic, but this is no time for jokes. I want Chuck to become more aware of his feelings, why he’s feeling this way, what his triggers are, and how he might change his reaction to them. My goal in therapy is to reframe his negative thinking and help him change his behavior. For Chuck’s situation, I would want to implement some of the techniques from a cognitive behavioral therapy as it can help him change those negative styles of3CASE CONCEPTUALIZATIONthinking and behaving that are associated with his depression, recognize and change thought patterns and behaviors that lead to his troublesome feelings, and limit distorted thinking by looking at concerns more realistically (Lawson). On the first session, however, I would want Chuck and I to get acquainted with each other so that we can start to build a healthy trust and relationship between client and therapist. In previous therapy sessions, Chuck has been known tohide his feelings, so, helping feel comfortable to open up will be imperative for therapy success. I understand that someone who was just left by their wife for another man may be feeling a bit (or very much) skeptical of my intentions because I am a woman and he may be harboring negative feelings towards the gender or, perhaps, even has a tall, tall wall built up to protect himself from more loss. In his book, The Gift of Therapy, Yalom explains, “I urge you to let yourpatients matter to you, to let them enter your mind, influence you, change you – and to not conceal this from them [the client]” (Yalom, p. 26). He expresses this make the client feel that heis cared about and that they’re not just another patient, which can help them become more trustworthy of us, therapists, and may take greater risks. At the same time, and in my attempt to help Chuck emphasize his capacity to make rational choices to develop his maximum potential, I would also want to implement some existential therapy techniques, although this approach is not technique oriented. As opposed to diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis, I would focus on description, understanding, and explorationof Chuck’s subjective reality. The reason I want to experiment with existential therapy in the caseof Chuck is because he mentioned that he feels hopeless when it comes to finding love again; so, because he is so devastated by the events that have recently taken place in his life, I would want to help him understand that we are responsible for our own choices and that we make our own4CASE CONCEPTUALIZATIONmeaning in life. He is in experiencing extreme feelings of loneliness and meaninglessness, whichare some existential fears I must help him understand, accept, and overcome. Trying to execute this intervention, however, can provoke an overwhelming sense of anxiety or dread in Chuck. Until I help him accept and find a way to live with the realities of being human, it will be impossible for him to continue to live authentically. The first thing I would want to do is to guide him in learning to take responsibility of his own choices as well as making choices that align with his values. The point of this is not to make or break a habit or learn particular skills, rather, the point of this is to create a realistic and authentic relationship with life. This will be likely to bring about a change in his perspective instead of encouraging short-term effort that he may not be motivated enough to continue once our session ends[ CITATION Cou19 \l 1033 ]. My role as a therapist within existential therapy concerns the understanding of the subjective world of my client to help them come to new insights and options. My function is to assist Chuck in seeing the ways he is constricting his awareness and the cost of such constrictions, which will allow him to engage in self-confrontation. This will allow him to see how he got to the way he is and how he can enlarge the way he lives. Once he is aware of the factors that played a role in creating the situation he is in now as well as the stifling modes of his present, he can begin to accept the responsibility for changing his future. My role as a therapist within the cognitive behavioral therapy is to listen, teach, and encourage as well as understand the function of Chuck’s behavior, including how certain behaviors originated and how they are sustained. He has been feeling like old wounds are being ripped open again as he compares how he’s currently feeling with how he felt when his father passed away. In finding out the importance of thoughts in determining how we feel and act, Chuck’s quality of life can improve.5CASE CONCEPTUALIZATIONMore importantly, it will help hi, improve his


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