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MEDICAL EQUIPMENT AND PROCEDURES

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Lesson 3 MEDICAL EQUIPMENT AND PROCEDURES Aim Identify the meaning of words which describe medical tools, equipment and procedures. DIAGNOSTIC AND SURGICAL PROCEDURES AND EQUIPMENT Below are some examples of terms used for medical diagnoses, procedures and equipment. As with other medical terminology these terms can be understood by breaking them down into their component parts. • Appendectomy - Surgical removal (-ectomy) the appendix (append-). • Arthroscopy - Surgical procedure where the internal structure of the joints is examined for diagnosis and/or treatment. The prefix Arthro refers to the joint, the suffix refers to the hollow, lighted instrument (scope) used to view the internal area. The replacement of the –e with a –y infers that the scope is being used to do something. • Bone Density Scan - A screening and monitoring test for osteoporosis and bone density. • Bone Marrow Aspiration and Biopsy - Procedure used to obtain the blood-forming portion (marrow) of the inner core of bone for examination in the laboratory or for transplantation. • CAT Scan - (Computerised Axial Tomography scan) a procedure that produces images of structures within the body created by a computer that takes data from multiple X-ray images and turns them in pictures on a screen. • Circumcision – Surgical removal of the foreskin covering the glans of the penis. Named after the incision that is made (-ision) that runs the circumference of the penis. However, nowadays different methods are used that often do not involve incisions. • Colonoscopy - Procedure using a viewing tube that enables an examiner to evaluate the appearance of the inside of the colon (the part of the large intestine between the caecum and the rectum). Again the suffix refers to the instrument used, the prefix to the area being examined. • Complete Blood Count - A calculation of the cellular (formed elements) of blood; generally determined by specially designed machines that analyse the different components of blood in less than a minute. Also known as a Full Blood Count or FBC. • Coronary Angiogram - The most precise method for evaluating and defining coronary artery disease (CAD). Angio refers to the blood vessels, coronary to the heart. 1STORAGE AND HANDLING OF MEDICINES • Medicines should be stored in a lockable cabinet. • Access should be controlled. • For some types of drugs, the use and dispensation must be controlled in accordance with the law. • Medicines are classified according to their level of toxicity and addictiveness. • Documentation should be kept on all medicines, along with expiry dates, quantities, concentrations, dosage instructions and appropriate safety/legal documentation and protocols. SELF ASSESSMENT Perform the self assessment test titled ‘Test 3.1.’ If you answer incorrectly, review the notes and try the test again. 2The Council on Family Health (http://www.cfhinfo.org/educationResources) makes the following recommendations - 1. Clean out your medicine cabinet at least once a year. Check expiration dates on medicines before each use. Throw away: • All medicines that are out of date. • Any medicine your doctor tells you to stop taking. • Any medicine that has a noticeable change in colour or smell. • Any medicine for which the label or package instructions are missing or cannot be read. 2. Dispose of medicines and dietary supplements safely. Before putting a medicine or supplement container in the trash, flush the contents in the toilet or wash them down the sink. 3. Store medicines in a cool, dry place. Medicines should not be stored in places where heat and moisture can affect their potency. This is especially important during the summer and when travelling; only store medicines in the refrigerator if the label tells you to do so. 4. Always store medicines and dietary supplements out of the sight and reach of children. Organize medicines and supplements for convenient and safe access, but remember that children are curious. Children who crawl and climb can easily reach medicines, vitamins or dietary supplements on countertops or shelves. Remember to place any handbags or briefcases containing such products out of the sight and reach of children. 5. Be sure all medicines have child-resistant caps. People who have difficulty opening these caps on prescription drugs can ask their pharmacist for regular closures. Many non-prescription drugs come in a size which has caps that can be used in households without young children. However, if young children are present, remember to put medicines out of their sight and reach and to replace child-resistant caps after use. 3Error! 6. Teach children to respect medicines. Avoid taking medicines in front of young children and never tell a child that the medicine you give them is candy or tastes like candy. 7. Read the label. Always follow the usage and dosing directions on the medicine label and pay attention to warnings. If you have questions, ask your doctor, pharmacist or other health care professional. 8. Take only your own prescription medicines. Prescription medicines should not be shared. No matter how well a medicine works for you, no one medicine is right for everyone. Only a doctor can judge whether a prescription medication is safe and effective for another person. Also, remember to keep all medicines in their original container to avoid taking the wrong thing. 9. Keep the phone numbers for poison control and your doctors near the telephone. Remember to discuss with babysitters these telephone numbers. If a caregiver is to give medicine to your child, make sure you write down instructions (when and how much medicine is to be given). 10. Taking medicines on schedule is an important part of the overall effect of many medications. If you lead an active life, talk to your doctor about simplifying your medicine schedule. When travelling, carry medicines with you; do not pack them in checked luggage. Always have a day’s supply of medicine with you when you’re out and about. Remember, when travelling make sure to store your medicines is a cool, dry place. Do not leave any medicine in the trunk or glove box of a car. Ask your doctor or pharmacist how you should adjust your medication schedule to account for changes in time zone, routine or diet. 4STERILISING EQUIPMENT All tools or equipment used in an


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