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UTD CS 5333 - Discrete Structures

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CS5333.002.17F Discrete StructuresFall 2017Syllabus (First Version)Course InformationCourse Number/Section: CS5333.002.17FCourse Title: Discrete StructuresTerm: Fall 2017Days & Times: Monday & Friday: 10:00am – 11:15am & Make up time slotsLocation: ECSS 2.412Professor Contact InformationProfessor: Dr. Yvo G. DesmedtOffice Phone: (972) 883-4536Email Address: [email protected] (not efficient: see further)Office Location: ECS 4.411Office Hours: Friday 2:30pm – 3:30pmTA Contact InformationTA: TBAEmail Address: TBACourse PrerequisitesPrerequisite: CS/SE 3345 or equivalent.Course DescriptionDiscrete Structures (3 semester hours) Mathematical foundations of computer science. Logic, sets, relations,graphs and algebraic structures. Combinatorics and metrics for performance evaluation of algorithms. (3-0) SCourse Goals and ObjectivesWhile programming is the foundation of computation, discrete structures is the tool that makes computer sciencea science. The goal of this course is to introduce students to discrete structures.Learning objectives include:• ability to use Boolean Algebra and set theory• ability to apply basic combinatorics• the understanding of logic behind proofs and capability of making them• the ability to apply basic properties of relations• ability to understand and apply properties of graphs in computer science1Required Textbooks and MaterialsDiscrete Mathematics and Its Applications, by Kenneth H. Rosen, McGraw Hill, Seventh editionSuggested Course MaterialIntroduction to Discrete Mathematics, by R. McEliece, R. Ash and C. Ash, Random House, New YorkGrading PolicyThe grade depends on the understanding of the material covered in class and on the correctness and the detailsgiven in answers to questions on exams and homeworks.homeworks: 2%first midterm: 24%second midterm: 24%final exam (cumulative): 50%The exact dates of the midterms will be announced well before the exam. The final exam is given during the 2hours and 45 minutes slot indicated in the final exam schedule of the university (to be announced). Studentsshould avoid booking any flights before knowing the final exam date. Fall 2017 final exams will beavailable for viewing after September 6, 2017, e.g., on Coursebook.Course & Instructor PoliciesClass attendance: Students are strongly encouraged to attend class. Since the material is very mathematicalstudents are strongly encouraged to do this. Besides the textbook, personal notes and other references are usedduring the class presentations. This implies that students have yet another benefit to attend classes.Although there is a significant overlap with Rosen’s book and the course, most material will be presented ina didactic way, different from Rosen’s book. Students who regularly attend class may do better on the exam.Students do not need to inform the instructor they will miss class. A student missing a class is stronglyencouraged to ask for the notes of 2 students who did attend that class.Homeworks:• assignments: Homework will usually be assigned by the instructor using e-mail. UTD has recently movedto Microsoft’s Outlook, resulting in several complains from students. Microsoft states:Email messages in your Microsoft Outlook 2010 Inbox and other mail folders can be organizedby date and arranged by Conversation. When Conversations is turned on, messages that sharethe same subject appear as Conversations that can be viewed expanded or collapsed. You canquickly review and act on messages or complete Conversations.To turn this off (and get the by date option), see:https://support.office.com/en-us/article/View-email-messages-by-conversation-0eeec76c-f59b-4834-98e6-05cfdfa9fb07The instructor strongly recommends students to use the date option.• returning homework: Students need to return homework on paper by the start of class the day thehomework is due. Students who miss this class, are encouraged to ask some other student to bring thehomework to class.• Late work policy: Students who return their homework too late will be penalized as follows:2– If a student is late, but turns his/her answer in before the start of the next class the student’s gradewill be multiplied with 0.9.– If a student waits longer, then the student receives no credit! His/her answer will be corrected.RecommendationsRelated to:Homeworks: students are strongly encouraged to make as many homeworks as possible. Warning: Studentscopying other students homeworks will be ill prepared for the midterms and for the final. To avoid this, studentsshould make their own homework. This will also allow the TA to figure out the progress (or lack) being made bythe student.The material seeming easy: for many students who are familiar with the concepts introduced during thefirst classes, this class seems easy. Unfortunately, this is very misleading. The instructor expects the students tounderstand the material in depth. Proofs are a very important part of this course.Students having the aforementioned impression often end up with a low grade.Final Exam: Questions on the final exam will be much more difficult than on the midterms. The instructor willclearly indicate what type of questions students can expect on the final exam.Student Conduct & DisciplineThe University of Texas System and The University of Texas at Dallas have rules and regulations for the orderlyand efficient conduct of their business. It is the responsibility of each student and each student organization to beknowledgeable about the rules and regulations which govern student conduct and activities. General informationon student conduct and discipline is contained in the UTD publication, A to Z Guide, which is provided to allregistered students each academic year.The University of Texas at Dallas administers student discipline within the procedures of recognized andestablished due process. Procedures are defined and described in the Rules and Regulations, Board of Regents,The University of Texas System, Part 1, Chapter VI, Section 3, and in Title V, Rules on Student Servicesand Activities of the university’s Handbook of Operating Procedures. Copies of these rules and regulations areavailable to students in the Office of the Dean of Students, where staff members are available to assist studentsin interpreting the rules and regulations (SU 1.602, 972/883-6391).A student at the university neither loses the rights nor escapes the responsibilities of citizenship. He orshe is expected to obey federal, state,


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