OSU ANTH 210 - Hawaii Slides (10 pages)

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Hawaii Slides



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Hawaii Slides

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Pages:
10
School:
Oregon State University
Course:
Anth 210 - Comparative Cultures
Comparative Cultures Documents
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2 25 15 KUKUI NUT HISTORY AND INFO The kukui nut is the state tree of Hawai i because of its many values The kukui kernel is used to make oils shampoos fuel for lighting The kukui kernel can also be cooked and chopped to use as a spicing Inamona Fishermen chewed the kukui kernel for clearing the water for fishing The shells of the kukui nut were used to make dyes in old times for the Kapa or Tapa The nut was often used to make the Hu a top like toy for all In ancient times the kukui nut was reserved to be worn by the reigning chiefs of Hawai i known as the Ali i HAWAII BEFORE WESTERN CONTACT Genealogies Traced to mythic gods through chant Pleiades star cluster New Year Symbolic Fertility cycle Year god Lono Hula dance Religiously used to invoke Lono s interest 1 2 25 15 SOUTH PACIFIC ISLANDS POLYNESIAN PIONEERS 1st phase Hawaii settled by Polynesian s 2nd phase refined agriculture and aquatic food production 3rd phase Expansion period agricultural technology A D 300 600 600 1100 A D Taro DEVELOPMENT OF SOCIAL HIERARCHY Ali i Nobles Had to conquer the land by forming alligences with the maka ainana Taxes given to Ali i Commoners All descendants from the same ancestor king Tied to chief through reciprocity Aloha 2 2 25 15 RECIPROCITY Reciprocity interchange of favors or privileges Different levels of reciprocity 1 2 3 Generalized someone gives and expects nothing immediate in return usually related through kinship Balanced exchanges between people who are more distantly related more distant kin or non kin Negative exchanges with people on fringes or outside of social system The reciprocity system in ancient Hawaii bound the Ali i and the commoners together 3 2 25 15 MANA TABOO Mana kings judged on how much mana they had Outstanding effectiveness in action Mana Often deserted chief who failed in battle referenced in terms of sheer abundance Taboo dangerous marked or set apart Divine is taboo MELE IN ANCIENT HAWAII v What is mele v Poetical compositions imagery describing natural scenery v Exquisite v Who performed the meles v Masters of meles were educated in the performance v Learned proper way to chant HULA What is hula What was its purpose Type of dance that uses bodily gestures to tell stories Considered a religious matter an accomplishment requiring education and arduous training Kumu teacher master of hula Repository of knowledge Has learned the tradition and will pass it on to those who will carry it to the future Halau the hall of the hula Kuahu altar Location was of prime importance Visible place for the deity whose presence was the inspiration of the performance Chant and hula Au a ia 4 2 25 15 MELE HULA IN ANCIENT HAWAII Mele and hula performed for many different functions Birth purification deaths battles feasts welcome Reinforced the status quo Constantly reworked and changing to incorporate new genealogies and political landscapes TRADITIONAL HAWAIIAN INSTRUMENTS Kaekeeke Pu ili Ipu hula Uli uli Pu nui Ukeke Ohe HISTORY OF HAWAII Film Act of War The Overthrow of the Hawaiian Nation 5 2 25 15 GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS Presentation topics Think about political movements that have taken place or are taking place currently outside of the US preferable outside of Western countries Make a list with 2 choices ARRIVAL OF FOREIGNERS Captain James Cook 1778 Fur trade from Northwest Guns introduced King Kamehameha I Unified all islands in 1810 Large army of 15 000 6 2 25 15 SANDALWOOD WHALING ERAS 1810 Hawaiian sandalwood tree main trade commodity Queen Ka ahumanu Encouraged Christianity Western dress styles Whaling industry Kept Hawaii from reverting back to a subsistence economy MAHELE REFORMS Mahele land division of 1850 s Privatization of land Konohiki land stewards Accused of taking tax money and gifts King s land government land Kuleana Act of 1850 SUGAR PLANTATIONS Sugar Plantations Mostly foreign labor Reciprocity Treaty 1876 Protect sugar economy Criticized King Kalakaua Catering to ha ole foreigners 7 2 25 15 TREATIES AND CONSTITUTIONS Reciprocity Treaty renewal 1887 US allowed to use Pearl River Harbor Repair station for navy Bayonet Constitution of 1887 Limited the Powers of the Monarchy Kalakua dies in 1891 Queen Lili uokalani Americans overthrow monarchy 1893 Annex Hawaiian Islands in 1898 Hawaii becomes US 50th state in NEW HAWAIIAN SOUND Ukulele Portuguese origins Jumping flea Slack Key Guitar Musical example detuned guitar Steel Slide Guitar Sand 20TH CENTURY TOURIST INVASION v 1900 s tourist influx v Large hotels and resorts v Songs created as Hawaiian sound v Commodified commercial music v Hollywood musicals of the 1940s 8 2 25 15 Hawaiian Renaissance v 1960 s new radio stations v Phillip Gabby Pahinui v Brought back traditional sound v Young people wanted to learn how to play the slackkey guitar and were able to learn from Gabby Hawaiian Renaissance v Hawaiian Protest music themes 1 2 3 Love and Celebration for land Hostility towards tourism and military Preservation of Hawaiian beliefs v Israel Kamakawiwo ole E Ala E Arise IZ HULA REVIVAL v The revival of the Hula Merrie Monarch Festival King Kalukua was known as the Merrie Monarch 9 2 25 15 GROUP WORK Israel Kamakawiwo ole Hawai i Listen 78 to the song then interpret the lyrics What message do you think IZ is delivering in this song Do you hear the 3 themes of Hawaiian protest music 10


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