Purdue OBHR 330 - OBHR 330 - Job Satisfaction (34 pages)

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OBHR 330 - Job Satisfaction



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OBHR 330 - Job Satisfaction

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Pages:
34
School:
Purdue University - Main Campus
Course:
Obhr 330 - Introduction To Organizational Behavior
Unformatted text preview:

6 Job Satisfaction Chapter 4 OBHR 33000 Organizational Behavior Professor Habashi Ch 4 LearnSmart Quiz Available 9 17 9 24 Lecture Outline Introduction to Work Related Attitudes Defining Job Satisfaction Job Satisfaction Values Job Satisfaction Psychological States Job Satisfaction Two factors Factors affecting Job Satisfaction Importance of Job Satisfaction Introduction to Work Related Attitudes Attitude Psychological tendency that is expressed by evaluating a particular entity with some degree of favor or disfavor Eagly Chaiken 1993 Tendency attitudes may change or stay the same Particular Entity often called attitude object can be anything one chooses to evaluate person place thing product etc can be concrete e g Pepsi or abstract e g equality Work related attitudes are attitudes relating to any aspect of work or work settings Introduction to Work Related Attitudes 3 Components of Attitudes 1 Affective emotional reactions and feelings toward your job 2 Behavioral behavior or actions toward your job I go to work everyday 3 Cognitive thoughts beliefs about your job being a software engineer is an important occupation Introduction to Work Related Attitudes Attitude More stable Can be based on emotion cognition or behavior Emotion More fleeting Based on physiological emotion states Defining Job Satisfaction Positive and negative evaluation of one s job Based on both attitudes and emotions in the workplace Describes the level of content a person has with their job Jumped up in the last few years 2013 to 2016 81 to 88 3 Perspectives on Defining Job Satisfaction Job satisfaction as a function of values Job satisfaction as a function of psychological states Job satisfaction as a function of two factors Job Satisfaction Values Value Percept Theory of Satisfaction Job satisfaction depends on the match between valued outcomes and the availability of those outcomes Discrepancy dissatisfaction Size of discrepancy depends on the importance of the outcome Discrepancy Vwant Vhave x Vimportance 5 Valued Facets of Jobs 1 Pay Satisfaction Feelings about pay does desired actual Based on 2 considerations Amount of work done Comparable colleagues 5 Valued Facets of Jobs 2 Promotion Satisfaction Does the organization offer the opportunity for growth Based on 2 considerations Organizations promotion policies explicit and implicit Execution of those policies 5 Valued Facets of Jobs 3 Supervision Satisfaction Feelings about boss Based on 2 considerations Can they help employee attain their values Are they likable 5 Valued Facets of Jobs 4 Coworker Satisfaction Feelings about coworkers Based on 2 considerations Do I like being around them Can they help me do my job 5 Valued Facets of Jobs 5 Satisfaction with the Work Itself Feelings about tasks and responsibilities Based on 2 considerations Are tasks challenging and interesting Are tasks using key skills not repetitive Which is most important Satisfaction with the work itself has the highest correlation w job satisfaction Focuses on what you do not the outcomes of what you do Which is least important Pay has lowest correlation w job satisfaction The aspect facet we think about least often Job Satisfaction Psychological States Job Characteristics Model Focuses on the work itself Ignores the outcomes and external factors of work pay friendships etc Identifies 5 core characteristics of jobs that lead to 3 psychological states Job Characteristics Model Hackman Oldham 1976 5 Core Job Characteristics Variety Identity how important is your position to organization Significance how important is your position to society Autonomy freedom in job Feedback Three Critical Psychological States 1 Experienced Meaningfulness Variety Identity Significance 2 Experienced Responsibility Autonomy 3 Knowledge of Results of Work Activities Feedback Growth Need Strength individuals need and desire for personal growth and development in job Affects whether this model successfully predicts motivation for each individual employee Interactive effect C1itcal psychological st ates Core job dimensions Skill variety Task identity Task significance Au tonomy Experienced meaningfulness of work Experience d responsibility for ou tcomes of work Knowledge of Feedbac actual k results of work activities Etnployee growth need strength C2 006 WadswoM Thomson Personal and vork outcomes High internal work motivation High qualit y work performance High satisfaction wi th work Low absenteeisn1 and turnover PURD UE K R A N N E R T SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT Job Satisfaction Two factors Hertzberg s Two Factor Theory Herzberg 1966 Jobs that motivate contain two factors 1 Motivators Factors related to content of job Factors that when present lead to job satisfaction Include responsibility recognition advancement growth Hertzberg s Two Factor Theory Jobs motivate based on two factors 2 Hygienes Factors related to context of job Factors that when absent create job dissatisfaction Include safety interpersonal relationships salary good working conditions However strong motivators can make up for weak hygiene factors Not a lot of research support for this theory Distinguishing motivators and hygienes difficult Do not seem to be two distinct factors Researchers disregard it but consultants still use it Defining Job Satisfaction Both Job Characteristics Model Two Factor Theory are used for Job enrichment programs Expanding job responsibilities to give employees greater role in planning executing and evaluating work Job crafting programs Employees shape mold and redefine job in a proactive way These three perspectives define global job satisfaction Overall feeling about your job Can also have specific or state job satisfaction Dislike certain aspects of your job Dislike your job at certain times Factors Affecting JS Mood Emotions Moods States of feeling that are often mild in intensity last for an extended period of time and have no specific cause Emotions States of feeling that are intense short lived and have a specific cause Mood Can be categorized on 2 dimensions Pleasantness Positive vs negative Activation Arousal Aroused vs unaroused Organizations try to foster positive mood Can result in flow Emotions Affective Events Theory Workplace events can trigger short term reactions that influence work attitudes and behaviors Categorized as positive or negative emotions Can be associated with two processes Emotional Labor The need to hide or manage emotions to complete job successfully Emotional Contagion Vicarious


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