LIBERTY PHIL 201 - Philosophy Study Guide Lesson 6 (2 pages)

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Philosophy Study Guide Lesson 6



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Philosophy Study Guide Lesson 6

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Pages:
2
School:
Liberty University
Course:
Phil 201 - Philosophy and Contemporary Ideas

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PHIL 201 STUDY GUIDE LESSON 6 Analyzing Arguments Lesson Overview In our final lesson on logic and arguing we discuss the tasks of constructing and analyzing an argument Throughout the rest of this course you will be introduced to a variety of theories that attempt to answer some puzzling philosophical questions These theories will argue for a particular way to answer the questions and you will want to be able to evaluate those arguments to see if you agree with them or not This lesson will give you a tactical approach in how to perform the tasks of analyzing and evaluating arguments as well as how to construct an argument of your own Tasks View and take notes on the video Analyzing Arguments It aims to orient you to the main issues in the reading Read and take notes from Chapter 7 of Prelude to Philosophy Analyzing Arguments As you read make sure to understand the following points and questions Why is clarity important for a good argument Being clear of what you are defending the structure of your reasoning and how the premises lead to the conclusion need to be clearly communicated Must use appropriate language and define any terms that need clarification Avoid using clich s ambiguity and vagueness What is the difference between consistent and coherent 1 Consistent within a set of beliefs none of them contradict one another 2 Coherent the beliefs relate together in a way that is mutually supportive What determines how comprehensive an argument needs to be Good arguments consider all know reasonable alternatives and arguments for aview and can account for them as part of the overall argument Not every alternative needs to be presented What are the 2 basic approaches to structuring an argument 1 State the conclusion first followed by the premises 2 State the premises and then follow with a therefore type of conclusion Explain the idea of fair use of evidence Good arguments use evidence fairly and avoid suppressing evidence in favor of a particular position do not



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