Berkeley HISTORY 2 - lecture3 (9 pages)

Previewing pages 1, 2, 3 of 9 page document View the full content.
View Full Document

lecture3



Previewing pages 1, 2, 3 of actual document.

View the full content.
View Full Document
View Full Document

lecture3

97 views


Pages:
9
School:
University of California, Berkeley
Course:
History 2 - Comparative World History

Unformatted text preview:

Week 3 Reading The Americas untouched by the connections reverberating across Afro Eurasia navigators couldn t cross the large oceans that separated the Americas from other lands commercial and expansionist impulses fostered closer contact among peoples who lived there Andean States growth and prosperity led to the formation of the Chimu Empire in South America South America s first empire developed early in the second millennium in the fertile Moche Valley bordering the Pacific Ocean the Moche people expanded their influence across valleys and ecological zones from pastoral highlands to rich valley floodplains to the fecund fishing grounds of the Pacific Coast geographical reach grew increased their wealth the China regime lasted until the Incas invaded and incorporated the Pacific state into their empire in the 1460s A Thriving Lowland Economy Chimu economy successful because it was commercialized especially through agriculture complex irrigation systems expanded production of food turned the arid coast into a string of fertile oases capable of feeding an increasingly dispersed population cotton became lucrative export to distant markets along the Andes llamas and porters lugged commodities up and down the steep mountain chains that are the spine of South America between 850 and 900 CE the Moche peoples founded the biggest city of Chan Chan with walls roads and palaces core population of 30 000 inhabitants An Inventive Highland State highland empire formed on the shores of Lake Titicaca by the Tiwanaku people extensive evidence of long distance trade between highlands and semitropical valleys highlanders migrating to the lowlands to produce agrarian staples for their kin in the mountains dried fish and cotton came from the coast fruits and vegetables came from lowland valleys trade was active enough to sustain an enormous urban population of 115 000 people Connections to the North additional hubs of regional trade developed farther north The Toltecs in Mesoamerica



View Full Document

Access the best Study Guides, Lecture Notes and Practice Exams

Loading Unlocking...
Login

Join to view lecture3 and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or
We will never post anything without your permission.
Don't have an account?
Sign Up

Join to view lecture3 and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or

By creating an account you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use

Already a member?