UNO URBN 1000 - Chapter 3_US Urban History.pptx (34 pages)

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Chapter 3_US Urban History.pptx



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Chapter 3_US Urban History.pptx

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history of cities nation wide, evolution to today, compare/contrast, why?


Pages:
34
School:
University of New Orleans
Course:
Urbn 1000 - Introduction to Cities
Unformatted text preview:

URBN 1000 Introduction to Cities Part 2 U S Cities Historical and Modern Perspectives Class Outline Development of North American cities Colonial America to the modern era The industrial city Rustbelt vs sunbelt cities 4 phases of urban North America The colonial era 1600 1800 Growth and Expansion Era 1800 1870 Industrial Metropolis Era 1870 1950 Modern Era 1950 present Colonial American cities Environmental advantages river cities port cities sites of trade Boston Charleston New Orleans 1718 French Savannah New York Colonial cities Small both in physical size and population Exception NYC socially diverse large economically strong and by 1643 had 18 languages spoken Narrow irregular street patterns that mimicked medieval cities Sites of export centers to the colonial empires British French New idea in the new world private ownership of land Colonial cities Colonial cities New Orleans 1700s Colonial cities Architecture old meets new Colonial cities Early Urban America First U S census 1790 4 million people Only 5 urban Although 95 rural majority of power concentrated in urban places in early America New York first capital 1789 Philadelphia second capital 1790 population 42 000 Federalist Party John Adams was a largely urban based political party that represented commercial and banking rather than agrarian and rural issues Growth and Expansion 1800 1870 Western and southern expansion Pre dawn to the Industrial Revolution in America Railroads no longer were cities limited to being located only by water but now technological advancement allowed urban areas to form by non water areas Midwestern cities Why New York grow much faster than any city Opens Erie Canal 1825 gave NYC economic supremacy Urban trade both with Europe and U S hinterlands Readily embraced railroads Banking commercial manufacturing might Urban Rural North South Tensions Anti urbanism Rural South versus urban North dichotomy country vs city slavery vs non slavery industrial vs agriculture Thomas Jefferson I view great American cities as pestilential to the morals the health and the liberties of man The Civil War Was the Civil War a confrontation between urban and rural between industrial and agricultural values Erie Canal American Urban Growth Industrial Revolution Policies implemented during Industrial Revolution Minimum wage workplace safety workers comp child labor laws 40 hr work week social security right to unionize American Industrialization Factory towns cities Textiles mills Mass production Urbanization capitalism Growth of manufacturing industry and machinery Industrial Metropolis Era 1870 1950 Shift from mercantile economy to industrial economy Manufacturing industries steel coal iron textile etc Technological advances Construction of skyscrapers 1884 Chicago 10 story steel building 1877 1899 elevators invention of steel frame buildings the light bulb electric power lines telephones subways and the internal combustion engine Cities grow rapidly Chicago doubled its population every decade from 1850 to 1890 1833 4 100 1890 1 000 000 1910 2 000 000 The Great Migration 1920 Chicago has 12x its 1870 population 3 000 000 Movement of rural poor blacks to the urban north Harlem Chicago s South Side Baltimore Detroit Cleveland Immigration forced to live in crowded tenements near their jobs at the factory Cultural heterogeneity assimilation problems Progressive movement middle class social reformers to Americanize urban immigrants eg Jane Addams Hull House Meanwhile middle and upper classes moving to streetcar suburbs which was 12 miles from the city core Quality of Life in industrial cities Rapid urbanization sanitation streets electricity over crowding poverty high density diseases Urban political bosses Discrimination and racism of immigrants New York tenements crowded dense unsanitary housing for the poor immigrants and people of color Old city boundaries cemeteries which were located on the outskirts of cities St Louis Cemetery 1 on edge of Quarter Tenement Housing Tenement Housing Urban Population Urban Population The modern era 1950 present 3 major trends of cities from the 1950s to today Decentralization the outward migration of people and businesses from the central city to outlying suburban region The older industrial city was a city of concentration and centralization of both jobs and housing Sunbelt expansion the growth of population commerce and industry in the South and West Rustbelt vs sunbelt Major population expansion occurring in environmental stresses such as Phoenix in the desert CBD jobs centered around white collar service and tech jobs Rustbelt Cities Rustbelt Cities Rustbelt Cities Rustbelt vs Sunbelt Sunbelt Cities 2000s Recession The modern era 1950 To The Present From rustbelt to sunbelt Although suburban population is growing everywhere it is growing fastest in the American South and West urban oasis Phoenix Los Angeles Tucson Las Vegas Albuquerque Environmental consequences Urban and suburban sprawl Interstates and infrastructure traffic congestion Water shortages and long term droughts


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