WVSU PSYC 151 - 241 Unit 4 Social & Emotional Development in Adolescence - outline (44 pages)

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241 Unit 4 Social & Emotional Development in Adolescence - outline



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241 Unit 4 Social & Emotional Development in Adolescence - outline

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Pages:
44
School:
West Virginia State University
Course:
Psyc 151 - General Psychology
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Social Emotional Development in Adolescence Announcements Reminders Homework 4 Exam 4 Work on Paper Outline Identity Erikson Marcia Ethnic Identity Families Parents Conflict Peers Friendships Romantic relationships Problems Violent media Suicide Who am I Make a list of 10 statements that are true about you Did your list reflect qualities differentiate you from others Reflect Relationships Physical characteristics Achievements Ethnicity Personality Political or Religious Permanent or situation based Erikson Identity and Identity Confusion Identity A series of basic life commitments in a variety of spheres Time or experimentation with roles and personality Psychosocial Moratorium time between childhood security and adult autonomy Figure 10 1 Marcia s Four Statuses of Identity These differ whether if a crisis or a commitment is occurring 10 6 Activity To test your understanding of Marcia s four identity statuses identify the status of the adolescent in each of the five scenarios Be sure to explain your reasoning behind your choices Crisis Commitment 1 Megan is a 14 year old who when asked what she wants to do when she graduates from high school replies Maybe I will get married and have some children or maybe I will be a neurosurgeon or a fashion designer Activity 2 Seventeen year old Suzanne is questioning the tenets of the religion in which she was brought up She is for the first time examining her beliefs and considering other belief systems At the end of the period she chooses to follow the same religion as her parents 3 Lorraine is 16 years old and when asked what she wants to do when she graduates from high school replies I never really thought about it I guess I will decide when the time comes 4 After Bill graduates from high school he plans to go into his father s business He has been talking this over with his parents since he was a preschooler and is eager to fulfill his parents expectations 5 Michael was asked to debate issues concerning premarital sex in his health class His parents always taught him that premarital sex was wrong and that they would be very disappointed if they discovered he had engaged in it himself After thoroughly investigating the consequences of premarital sex Michael came out against it Identity Developmental changes Key changes in identity are more likely to take place in emerging adulthood than in adolescence Identity does not remain stable throughout life MAMA Repeated cycles of moratorium to achievement 1012 Ethnic Identity Ethnic identity enduring aspect of the self that includes a sense of membership in an ethnic group along with the attitudes and feelings related to that membership Bicultural identity adolescents identify in some ways with their ethnic group and in other ways with the majority culture Ethnic Identity in Immigrant Groups are likely to be and unlikely to change much are more likely to think of themselves as ethnic identity is likely to be linked to retention of their ethnic language and social networks Families Everyday conflicts serve a positive developmental function Old model of parent adolescent relationships suggested that As adolescents mature they detach themselves from parents and move into a world of autonomy apart from parents New model emphasizes that Emerging adulthood to move out Parents serve as important attachment figures and support systems while adolescents explore a wider more complex social world Autonomy and Attachment Adolescent s push for autonomy can lead to conflict with parents The wise adult relinquishes some control but continues to guide the adolescent Boys are give more independence than girls Secure attachment may by important in adolescents relationships with their parents Behavioral Control Parents rules regulations restrictions and awareness of teens activities Facilitates development by providing necessary supervision guidance Parental MONITORING Research has shown this is associated with fewer EXTERNALIZING problems delinquency drugs etc Parental Knowledge Methodologically monitoring research has focused on what parents know about their teens activities But there are a lot of different ways parents could get this knowledge Parental solicitation of information Surveillance and control Child disclosure Parental Knowledge Stattin Kerr Examined role of different forms of parental knowledge on juvenile delinquency Controlled for trust CHILD DISCLOSURE and not parental solicitation or behavioral control predicted lower levels of juvenile delinquency Adolescent Information Management and Secrecy Adolescents may be motivated to NOT disclose some information to parents To avoid getting in trouble Because they view it as none of parents business Research has focused on adolescent INFORMATION MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES Lying Avoidance Partial disclosure Discussion Questions In adolescence When you fought with your parents with whom did you fight What did you fight about How frequently Parent Adolescent Conflict Frequency greatest in early adolescence then declines Intensity increases from early to middle adolescence Mother daughter dyads are the most conflictive dyad followed by mother son Mostly about everyday issues Parent Adolescent Conflict Centers on everyday events of family life Developmental change in Frequency of Conflict Explanations for Increases in Conflict Sociobiological explanations Result of biological changes testosterone Steinberg Hill Changes in expectancies Violations of what is expected behavior during times of rapid change Collins Social cognitive changes Differences in adolescents parents interpretations of issues Social Domain Theory People reason about issues from different domains of social knowledge Morality Harm fairness Social Conventions Uniformities to promote order Personal jurisdiction I can keep a dirty room if I want Individual perogative Prudential driving laws curfews One s own safety Conflict and Adolescent Development Parents reasoning appeals to social conventions Socialize the adolescent into family community and cultural norms and expectations Adolescents reasoning appeals to personal jurisdiction Serve to individuate adolescents increase personal agency enlarge sphere of personal action Resulting Conflict Dialectical Process whereby boundaries of parental authority transform Peers Friendships Most teens prefer a smaller number of friendships that are more intense and more intimate Friends become increasingly important in meeting social needs Friendships Sullivan


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