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UA FSHD 257 - Exam 1 Study Guide

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Adolescence did not exist. Childhood not a period of life different from adulthood=small adult. At age 6 or 7 children became apart of adult world. Children 7-12 worked as apprentices or servants, often living with relatives or strangersAll family members worked for survivalChildren in labor force earlyMiddle class ideal of motherhood impossibleTensions between family and schoolFamily as a filter for new customs and rulesAlcoholism increasedDissatisfaction with being a housewife seen as a mental illnessTranquilizers developed for women and mass prescribedRemember the Rolling Stone’s song, “Mother’s little helper”?FSHD 257 1st EditionExam # 1 Study Guide Lectures: 1 – 3, 550 multiple choice questions, worth 2 pts each = 100 pointsChapter 1 & Notes/LectureShould you generalize from your own personal experience to marriages and families in general? Why or why not. -Yes, but remember experience is not expertise. It is okay to use experience but you must support your assertions with research. Definition of Marriage-A legally recognized union between two people, generally a man and women, in which they are united sexually, cooperate economically, and give birth to, adopt, or bear children. The union is assumed to be permanent. What is the difference between monogamy, polygamy, and polyandry? Which is most common?-Monogamy one spouse at one time-Polygamy two or more wives at one time-Polyandrytwo or more husbands at one time What are the 4 characteristics that all marriages share?-Rights-Specific roles within wider community and society-Orderly transfer of wealth and property-Assignment of responsibility for caring for and socializing childrenIn the United States today, is marriage viewed as a divine or civil institution? What is needed to validate a marriage?-Many Americans believe that marriage is divinely instituted and a marriage must be validated via government issued marriage licenses to be legal.Definition of Family-A group of two people or more related by birth, marriage, or adoption and residing together; all such people are considered as members of one family. What is meant by the term Nuclear family?-A family consisting of a mother, father, and childrenWhat is the Family of Orientation?-The family in which we grow up, the family that orients us to the world. What is extended family? Kinship networks? -Extended family consists not only of the cohabiting couple and their children but alsoof other relatives, especially in laws, grandparents, aunts, uncles, and cousins. -Kinship networksthe social organization of the family. It is the reciprocal rights and obligations of the different family members, such as those between parents and children, grandparents and grandchildren, and mothers-in-law and sons-in-law4 important family functions:-The provision of intimacy-The formation of a cooperative economic unit-Reproduction and socialization-The assignment of social roles and status, which are acquired both in a family of orientation (in which we grow up) and in a family of cohabitation (which we form by marrying or living together) Advantages to living in families: -Continuity of emotional attachments-Close proximity-Familiarity with family members-Economic benefitsText:Re-read – “Experience versus Expertise” section (page 4)Re-read – “Who may Marry” section- Could slaves marry?o No- When did it become unconstitutional for states to prohibit marriages between different races? What court case was this? o 1967o Loving vs. Virginia- Can same sex couples legally marry in all 50 states today?o NoWhat is meant by the terms “serial monogamy” and “modified polygamy”?-Serial monogamy a practice in which one person may have several spouses over his or her lifetime although no more than one at any given time-Modified polygamy an alternative term for serial monogamy Re-read – “The Major Themes of this Text” section (pp 26 - 28)-Families are dynamic-Families are diverse: race, ethnicity, social class, gender, sexuality, and lifestyle variation -Outside influences on family-The interdependence of families and the wider societyChapter 2 & Notes/LectureHow does popular culture depict marriages and families? Is it accurate?-Conveys images, ideas, beliefs, values, myths, and stereotypes about every aspect of lifeand society, including the family. No, it is a source of information and misinformation.Why is it important that the knowledge of marriages and families in the field of FSHD comes from research based studies and not common sense, anecdotal evidence, tradition or media sources?-Because research uses the scientific method to answer questions. All families are different, so to find commonalities or overall findings, scientific evidence is needed. Common sense differs between each individual and family. What is objectivity? -Suspend the beliefs, biases, or prejudices we have about a subject until we understand what is being saidWhat is critical thinking?-The objective analysis and evaluation of an issue in order to form a judgmentWhat are value judgments? Opinions? Bias? Stereotypes? Be able to identify examples of these.-Value judgments usually include words such as “should and imply an orientation (good or bad)”-Opinion based on experiences or ways of thinking-Bias strong opinion that creates barriers to hearing anything contrary to your opinion-Stereotypes set of simplistic, rigidly held, and overgeneralized beliefs about the personal characteristics of a group of peopleWhat is the scientific method and why is it important?-Well established procedures used to collect and analyze information about family experiences-Model or process designed to promote objectivity-Systematic pursuit of knowledge-Follows specific, systematic processWhat methods do researchers use to study marriages and families?-Surveys (questionnaires)-Interviews-Diary or beeper method-Observation (naturalistic and laboratory)-Experimental (cannot always be done because one cant randomly assign participants)What is a theory? Why are these important/useful? What do they help researchers do?-Set of general principles or concepts used to describe, explain a phenomenon and to make predictions-Theories are useful because they organize and give meaning to facts and observations-Theories are explanations that help guide further research, lead to further questions, and act like a lens and show what is importantWhat is the difference between macro and


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