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CORNELL ILROB 1220 - Motivation

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ILROB 1220 1st Edition Lecture 5 Outline of Last Lecture I. Structure of US Airline Industrya. External and Internal Congruence of SouthwestII. Congruence Analysis and ConclusionIII. Current Real Life DevelopmentsIV. TakeawaysOutline of Current Lecture I. MotivationII. Acquired Needs TheoryIII. Expectancy TheoryIV. Situational ApproachesV. Job Characteristic TheoryVI. Social Information ProcessingVII. Drives of motivationCurrent Lecture: MotivationI. To align people in the organization, managers need to:a. Selective hiringb. Socialization and trainingc. Motivate!II. Motivationa. Set of processes that arouse, direct, and maintain human behavior toward a goalb. Person Centered motivation theories: what personal needs motivate people? What cognitive processes take place to motivate?c. Situational Approaches to motivation: how does the environment motivate people? d. Interactional approach: combines person centered and situational III. Maslow’s Hierarchy of NeedsThese notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.a. Pyramidb. The lower needs need to be satisfied to achieve the upper needsIV. Acquired Needs Theorya. Need for achievement: desire to do something more efficientlyb. Need for affiliation: desire to establish friendly relationshipsc. Need for power: desire to control othersV. Expectancy Theorya. Proposed by Victor Vroom in 1964b. Expectancy: probability assigned by an individual that work effort will be followed by a given level of achievementc. Instrumentality: probability of work outcomed. Valence: value attached by the individual to a work outcomee. Motivation = E times I times Vi. You must have all three!VI. Situational Approacha. Proposed by Frederick Taylor in 1911 in the Hawthorne Studiesi. Productivity rose because workers received extra attentionii. Productivity fell because workers thought management was expecting moreiii. There are hygiene factors (salary, working conditions) and motivator factors (achievement, recognition)VII. Job Characteristics Theorya. Skill variety: requires different activities to complete a jobb. Task identity: requires completion of a whole identifiable piece of workc. Task significance: job is important and makes meaningful contributionsd. Autonomy: freedom, independence, and discretione. Job feedback: employee can obtain direct feedbackVIII. Social information Processinga. Individual needs, task perceptions, and reactions are all socially constructedb. Peers define critical aspects of the jobIX. Summarya. To motivate people you must consider person, situation, and interactionX. Drives of motivationa. Drive to acquireb. Drive to bondc. Drive to comprehendd. Drive to defende. Incentives should support the right thingsi. Intrinsic: personal satisfactionii. Extrinsic: external tangible forms of recognitioniii. Managers control intrinsic, while benefits of extrinsic parts of jobs can be difficult to measure and


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