New version page

UA MC 101 - Magazines/Newspapers

Type: Lecture Note
Pages: 10

This preview shows page 1-2-3 out of 10 pages.

View Full Document
View Full Document

End of preview. Want to read all 10 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a GradeBuddy member to access this document.

View Full Document
Unformatted text preview:

MC 101 1st Edition Lecture 8 Outline of Last Lecture 1. Magazine numbers2. Stages of media development 3. First magazines4. Early American magazines 5. General interest magazines6. Muckrakers and social change7. Keys to magazine development8. Mass circulation magazines9. Fall of general interest, rise of special interest10. Adapting to new media 11. Types of magazines12. Consumer test13. Trade magazines14. PR magazines 15. Other types of magazines Outline of Current Lecture 1. Top magazines by revenue 2. Top magazines by circulation 3. The magazine staff 4. The players: the publisher5. Staff6. Reader7. Controversies8. Dick Stolley’s cover rules9. Newspaper numbers10. First newspapersThese notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.11. Newspapers in early America12. Characteristics of early US newspapers13. Licensing and seditious libel 14. Zenger trial 15. Newspapers and the American revolution 16. Changes in the concept of news 17. Ethnic press18. Penny press 19. Changes in concept of newsCurrent LectureChapter 5: Magazines (Continued…) Top Magazines by RevenueTop Magazines by CirculationThe Magazine Staff (test)The Players: The Publisher (test)- Person or corporation - Entrepreneurs: with strong interest; Jan Wenner Rolling Stone - 500-1000 launched a year, 20% survive to year 2- Often sell to corporation - Mission statement: a brief explanation of how the magazine will be unique and what will make itsuccessful - Celebrity publishers: Martha Stewart, Oprah - Corporate Publisher: Family Circle by Piggly Wiggly; Woman’s Day A&P (test)- Sponsored Magazines: Published by associations: National Geographic, AARP The Magazine (test)Understanding Today’s Magazine Publishing Industry – Top magazine corporate publishersStaff (test)- Publisher: Runs the company - Editorialo Editor (Editor in Chief, Executive Editor o Section editors o Copy editorso Writers (reporters) o Free lance writers; contributing Editor (high paid free lance writers) - Business o Advertising (and research); cost per thousand (CPM) and audit bureau of circulation (ABC)  Audit how many people see ads and verify it o Production: Coordinates printing, typically outside printers: computerized o Promotion: in-house and outside publicityo New Product Development: generate innovative alternative sources of revenue, known as brand extensionso Better Home and garden license to greeting cards, real estate service, garden centers o Mobile applications now new focus - Circulation – findings and keepings subscribers manage the subscriber list and promote single-copy sales (test)o Blow=in cards: post-card size boxes with subscription solicitation o Subscription fulfillment companies: businesses that specialize in soliciting magazine subscriptions: Publishers clearing house o Split-run editions: versions of same magazine  Breaking audience apart by some variable and sending out different versions of magazines out to different people o Demographic editors: versions based on different demographic characterizes o Regional editions: versions based on different geographic areas o Paid circulation magazines: readers actually pay subscriptions fees and newsstand charges; people TESTo Controlled circulation magazines: magazines are sent free to readers who qualify; ex. Overdrive TESTThe Reader (test)- 90% of American adults read 12 issues a month on average- Higher income, education read more - Pass-along circulation: Readership beyond the original purchaser of a publication - High magazine, low TV; magazine reading is increasing - Involvement: 95% of US adults cite magazines as primary source of insights and inspirations - Research key: Ex. Internal, Simmons Market Research Bureau, Mediamark Research Inc. Controversies - Women’s Image: 5’10, 120 lbs; reality: 5’3, 144 lbs - Editorial independence vs. advertisers Ex. Trucking industry - Coverage for advertising: Saturday Evening Post Cover to Ford for ad purchase - Subscription fulfillment tricks: Win $1 Million, etc.Dick Stolley’s Cover Rules- Young is better than old - Pretty is better than ugly - Rich is better than poor - Music is better than movies - Movies are better than television - Nothing is better than a dead celebrityChapter 6: Newspapers and NewsNewspaper Numbers- Newspapers account for 14% of media industry revenues in US- Issue of declining sales and revenue First Newspapers- China 1200 years ago, Woodcuts- Rome: Acta Diurna; Posted in early Roman Empire - Gutenberg; Germany: early 1600s - Italy; Cost a gazetta; Gazette - Develop through Europe in 1600s Newspapers in Early America - Bozton’s Publick Occurrences both Foreign and Domestic; Benjamin Harris 1690- One issue; print on 3 pages, last page for people to add news - Boston news-letter, john Campbell 1704; first to last more than 1 issue - Boston gazette, 1719 Characteristics of Early US Newspapers - Weekly; first daily in 1784- 4 pages; relatively expensive; paper, labor - Done by printers, inaccurate; age of printer (1700s) - Rumors, announcements, dated Licensing and Seditious Libel TEST- Boston News-letter; published by authority of colonial government; licensing - New England courtant; 1721 w/o “by authority” - After licensing; establish seditious libel laws - Laws established by colonial America that made it illegal to criticize government or its representatives Zenger Trial TEST- John Zenger, New York Weekly - Imprisoned for seditious libel in 1735 by Gov. William Cosby - Anna Zenger took over during trial- Major change: Truth as a defense- Officially sanctioned in 1791 in first amendment - Affect course of American journalism and news Newspapers and the American Revolution - Mercantile Press: News of business and shipping - Partisan Press: owned and supported by political parties - Revolution: 1/3 patriot (Whig); 1/3 loyal to British (Tory); 1/3 undecided- Play major role in revolution - Stamp act 1765- Federalist papers: Hamilton, Madison and jay; essays explained new federal government - America’s Second Revolution: Hamilton vs. Jefferson; Age of the Editor (1800-1840)Changes in the Concept of News - 1800s Standardization of News - Editorial Page: Reserved for statements representing opinion - Hard News: Current events that have impact on people’s lives- Feature news: directed toward human interest and curiosity; soft news Ethnic Press TEST- Foreign-Language


View Full Document
Loading Unlocking...
Login

Join to view Magazines/Newspapers and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or
We will never post anything without your permission.
Don't have an account?
Sign Up

Join to view Magazines/Newspapers and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or

By creating an account you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use

Already a member?