New version page

UGA FHCE 3300 - History of Housing Part 1

This preview shows page 1-2-3 out of 9 pages.

View Full Document
View Full Document

End of preview. Want to read all 9 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a GradeBuddy member to access this document.

View Full Document
Unformatted text preview:

FHCE 3300 1nd Edition Lecture 9 Outline of Last Lecture I. House PaymentsII. Front-end RatioIII. Back-end RatioIV. The Three-Legged Stool of Housing EquityA. Down PaymentB. Principal Drawdown C. House Price Appreciation V. Mortgage LoansA. Mortgage FinancingB. Interest RatesC. Loan TermD. Types of Mortgage LoansA. Fixed-rateB. Adjustable-rateOutline of Current Lecture I. Early Colonists: Early 1600sII. Early HomesA. Colonial HomesThese notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.B. Hall and Parlor CottagesC. Mid-late 1600s-1700sD. SaltboxE. Function of Early Colonial HomesF. Colonial HouseholdsG. Colonial TownsIII. American Independence and ExpansionA. American IndependenceB. Housing as Social EqualizerC. Changes in HousingD. Common Architecture StylesE. Multi-family HousingIV. Victorian EraCurrent LectureI. Early Colonists: Early 1600s- English were largest group to colonize North America People without land or a claim to land People escaping religious persecution Puritans—artisans, farmers, commercial merchants – had more $ than other groups- Wanted to break with aspects of their English heritage- Housing forms tied to daily life, religious sentiment, social order and family bonds- Conditions in New England were difficult, even for those with prestige and $- Early homes very primitive - Provided very minimal protection- Early homes – dugouts, wigwams, huts made with small trees Adaptations of Indian dwellings Made from local materials Also wattle and daub huts, which had been used in England for centuries- House primarily shelter from weather and danger- Homes built by household members, typically small- Early settlers had to spend much of their time raising foodEarly homes had very simple shapes and few windows. Why were these design elements important? Didn’t have tools, glass very expensive and rareII. Early Homes- Used post and beam construction- Large timber posts attached to large timber beams using mortise and tenon joints- Required a high level of skill and time- Kept # to a minimum by limiting # of outside corners- Shapes of houses were fairly simpleA. Colonial Homes- One-room framed cottages- Stone/brick fireplaces- Kitchen lean-to at back- Stone dwellings if field stone available- Hall and parlor homes- Few windows – glass expensive, heat conservation, ward off Indian attacksB. Hall and Parlor Cottages- One of the earliest forms of housing- 1 and 2-room homes- 1.5 stories- Steep, gabled roofs- Side or front gables- Cape Cod cottages and Saltbox homes grew out of this house formC. Mid-late 1600s-1700s- Permanent wooden houses, particularly among wealthy- Colonists brought ideas of home they had left behind in Europe- Factors that shaped architecture of early American homes Available natural materials Climate SecurityD. Saltbox - Wood frame and siding- Asymmetrical roof styleE. Function of Early Colonial Homes- 2 rooms downstairs emphasized self-control and industriousness Room for carrying out domestic life – cooking, eating, soap and candle-making, spinning, weaving, reading scripture Parlor – receive guests, honoring the dead Kitchens added later- Upstairs – bedrooms and general storage- Separation of public and private areas of homeF. Colonial Households- Single-family home occupied by parents and children were rarely seen in colonial times- For Puritans, no one was allowed to live alone- Apprentices, workers often lived in homes of their employers- Bachelors and widow/widowers were placed with other families- Part of the social contract of the time – family gov’t G. Colonial Towns- Puritan development of towns was very orderly, controlled- Townships – square, 6 miles to a side- Built around a meeting house- People were required to live close to town center- Model town was intended to be an agricultural settlement with a dense core Homes at center Farm land, common fields beyond centerIII. American Independence and ExpansionA. American Independence - Country seeking an identity – an American way of doing things- Looking for an American culture to unite diverse groups in nation- Strengthen country’s political and social goals- Country was expanding westward Jefferson’s National Survey (1785) – a system of land allotment Concept of equal, independent households- Absolute freedom and total equality were ideals- Land plentiful and easy to obtain- Belief that the built environment had strong effect on human beings- Belief that home environment could bring greater peace among different groups- Importance of homes as the setting for families, idea of a typical American family and matching house emergedB. Housing as Social Equalizer- People of various social standing and occupations lived in similar housing styles, promoting idea of an equal society- Economic, social and racial segregation was common despite appearance of housing C. Changes in Housing- Simple forms in housing was considered evidence of equality- Homes built by carpenters and builders rather than by household- Single adults moved into new forms of housing (boarding, tenement), increasing privacy for families- Interest in new aesthetic style with an emphasis on practicality and economy,classical forms- Neighborhood taverns, shops, coffee houses and markets meant more social gatherings outside of homeD. Common Architecture Styles Georgian FederalE. Multi-family Housing- Built by developers, beginning of speculative development - Simple, homogeneous floor plans- Working, middle and upper class households- Some still included non-family members (servants, apprentices, boarders)Urban row houses Boarding houses Tenement housingIV. Victorian Era - Beginning of industrial age- Population growth, immigration and westward expansion- Urbanization- Commercial sawmills and nail-making machines led to stud wall construction- Cast iron stoves replaced massive fireplaces as the principle source of heat- Network of railroads permitted shipment of lumber and millwork- Why/how would these changes influence the style of housing built during this era? More intricate designs, bigger- Home viewed as place of refuge from distractions of the world outside- At the time, was considered modern suburban home, closer to nature- Builders promised potential buyers comfortable surroundings, well-built homes as well as escape from problems of poor


View Full Document
Loading Unlocking...
Login

Join to view History of Housing Part 1 and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or
We will never post anything without your permission.
Don't have an account?
Sign Up

Join to view History of Housing Part 1 and access 3M+ class-specific study document.

or

By creating an account you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use

Already a member?