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UGA CLAS 1000 - Greek Culture

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CLAS 1000 1st Edition Lecture 10Outline of Last Lecture I. Epic Encounters: Early Archaica. Homeri. Book 22 (…mistreatment of corpse)ii. Book 23 (Burial of Patroklos, funeral games)iii. Book 24 (Priam and Achilles…)Current LectureBook 24:- Burial of Hektoro Counterbalance to Patroklos- Entire city in a state of lamentationo Singing of durges A song cultureo Women lead the sorrow/crying/mourningo Public display- Three speeches given: Andromache (wife), Hekabe (mother), Helen (sister-in-law)o Same women whom Hektor visited when he went to troy in book 6o Talk of their personal grief/losseso Sympathy and civilization (cf. Priam and Achilles)o Community comes together to grieve over Hektor’s death Death of Hektor = fall of TroyFinal words of the Iliad: Hektor is the breaker of horsesIliad: Achilles- Ambiguityo Half god/ half mano more than human/ less than humano civil/ barbarico Gets to chose between two fates: fight in war and die young as a hero or stay home and grow old but die unknown- Dreadful Passionso Extreme personality: menisThese notes represent a detailed interpretation of the professor’s lecture. GradeBuddy is best used as a supplement to your own notes, not as a substitute.o Great violence, great compassiono Heroic temper: proud, emotional, stubborn, capable, easily angeredWhy do people care about the Iliad?- Myth as a paradigm: human conditions on a grand scale- A way ti talk about things or issues in society- A form of education: how society works/ how society should workIliad themes:- Ideal (aristocratic) world view:o Heroic ethico Externalized psychologyo Appearance vs. reality (ugly on the outside = ugly on the inside)o Social boundaries maintainedo Roles of arbitration- Problems:o Dueling timé (king/priest, king/warrior)o Timé- kleos gap: measuring up to pasto Individual vs. society: tradgedy of Hektor, violation of conventions- Religious attitudes:o God/man asymmetryo Gods are not always ethical in their actso Supplicationo Burial and lamentation- Beyond war:o War/peace tensiono Cost of waro ParenthoodPart B: Hesiod- Same genre as Homer: epic poem- Same language, rhythm- dactylic hexameter- Different context:o Homer: heroic narrativeo Hesiod: teaching (didactic), revalation from the muses- Large scale (Homer) vs small scale (Hesiod)- Ideal (Homer) vs. realistic (Hesiod)Works and Days:- Teaches about farming- Uses a story about brotherly discord with Perses to give lesson- Strife (eris)- personified abstraction as divinity (external psychology)o Split personality: Good Strife- emulates success, healthy competition Bad Strife- jealousy, source of disputes- Brother vs. Brother squabble over inheritance of propertyo A common problem in Greece: increased population and limited land- Need for arbitration: “kings” as judges, act as a neutral 3rd partyo Arbitration scenes in Homer: Aias: blood price Shield of Achilleso Social convention- prevents violence, informal (not codified)o Requires fairness- “straight judgments,” egalitarian, order, standard- Problems: human beings don’t do what they should: jealously, greedo Kings are biased and can easily be bribedo Malicious lawsuits- using the system to get what you wanto Absent in Homer because he writes the ideal/ how things should be, not how they actually are.- Justice (diké): goddess who makes sure system workso Daughter of Zeuso Ethics tied to religion, cosmic ordero Necessary for human civilization (animals don’t have


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