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SC ENGL 102 - Value Systems ILP

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Hunter HartnettEnglish 10228 February 2014Value Systems ILPPre-Research:In this ILP, I’m looking into the topic of NCAA and its restrictive policy on student-athlete benefits, including athletes receiving payment. This has been a very controversial subject lately with many, including prominent coaches such as our own Steve Spurrier, arguing that players should be compensated for the hard work and play. Others, including the NCAA, have maintained the firm stance that players are students first, and the scholarships they receive are more than enough compensation. This stance has brought a lot of criticism on to the NCAA, as they are profiting heavily off of players such as Johnny Manziel while these players are receiving little or nothing in return. The NCAA is also seen as having a monopoly over college athletics, as college players have little negotiation room because they are not allowed to unionize nor have agents, and most professional leagues today require at least a year between graduating high school and entering the draft. The players have no choice if they want to be recruited highly in the professional ranks. I’ve chosen the book “The Cartel: Inside The Rise and Imminent Fall Of The NCAA” tocover this topic. I felt like this book, written by Taylor Branch, did a great job giving background information on the NCAA, and supported his claim of why the NCAA is certain to fall with many examples.Citation:Branch, Taylor. The Cartel inside the Rise and Imminent Fall of the NCAA. San Francisco, CA: Byliner, 2011. Print.In his book, author Taylor Branch discuses the NCAA’s rise to dominance through it’s exploitations of student athletes, and how it conquered a previously unoccupied. He talked about how it set itself up like a functioning monopoly rather than the non-profit organization it is listed as. The NCAA did well to effectively cut off all other options for graduating high school students, and similar to the pre-Civil Rights era, attempted to take away all individual rights of the student athletes. He also goes on to explain how this, in the end, will be the downfall of the NCAA, and compares it in effect to a tyranny, which can only support itself for so long before it crumbles do to a push for individual rights.Post Research:I agree with most of the ideas Branch establishes. I think that the NCAA is much too restrictive over it’s athletes, and that they should be able to receive pay, even if it is only a hundred or so dollars a game, to compensate for not being able to pick up another job due to athletics being a priority. He goes on to say “The NCAA makes money—and enables universities and corporations to make money—from the unpaid labor of young athletes” (Branch 3). I agree with his claim, while the NCAA and individual universities are reaping the benefits of field good football teams, the players working hard and risking their health are not seeing any of the


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